News Sir David Attenborough: 'I promised I would do something'

It's a theory that hasn't been proposed by politicians yet

Postcard from New York: Blood on the streets

New York may lack a Groucho Club, a Garrick, a Hurlingham, and other contenders in the home-away-from-school, Drones' tradition, but this is not to say that New York has no exclusive societies at all. Alumni of the Ivy League can gain admittance to stately and soporific college clubs, where the stuffed wart-hog heads in the lounge look infinitely more animated than the men who sit beneath them. After a Nobel Prize or two, creative types can eventually hope to swell the ranks of the very Jamesian Century Club, where they will pop in for chicken soup and a brief confab every solstice or two. But by far the most elite club of all is the city's premier youth gang, the Bloods, whose attractions are so alluring that people lately have been going so far as to slit a vein in their bids to win membership. It is perhaps unfortunate that the veins they slit are not their own. To become a full-fledged Blood, entitled to sport cigarette-burn insignia and assorted "wilding" paraphernalia, aspirants must slash a total stranger.

Return of the living dead to a cinema near you

With 'Scream' raking it in at the box office, are we about to see another renaissance of the horror film? asks Tim Cornwell

Box Clever: Frights of your life

Psycho Alfred Hitchock's classic chiller has aged well. As Barker says, who has never thought of this film at some point while taking a shower?

The bro also rises

interview Joaquin Phoenix: Meet 'Wah-keen', formerly known as Leaf: sibling of River (also of Rain, Summer and Liberty), boyfriend of Liv (Tyler) and 22-year-old upcoming screen god owner of weird name and upcoming screen god

also showing...

Scream Wes Craven (18) Female Perversions Susan Streitfeld (18) The Boy from Mercury Martin Duffy (PG) Liar Liar Tom Shadyac (12) Margaret's Museum Mort Ransen (15) It Takes Two Andy Tennant (PG)

The sweet sound of the ovation

THEATRE

THEATRE Halloween Night Rough Magic, Dublin

Combining the peer-group reunion idea of his Digging for Fire with the blackly ironic use of the supernatural in New Morning, Declan Hughes's sardonic new play, Halloween Night, slots into the Donmar Warehouse next week after its Dublin run. Again, Hughes is concerned with urban, university-educated adolescents in their early 30s, coverging on yet another vapid, unhappy, evening of alcohol; here, in a house on the west coast of Ireland, on a night when dead souls are supposed to be roaming the earth.

ON THE FRINGE Seventy Scenes of Halloween; Get Out of Hear!; It Took More Than One Man

The 70th scene in Seventy Scenes of Halloween (Pentameters, Hampstead) consists solely of a banner with the words "The End" daubed in crude strokes of stage-blood. It's Jeffrey M Jones's little joke, at once acknowledging his work's resemblance to a cheap horror movie and re-summoning, at the 11th hour, the conventional narrative spirit which the previous 68 scenes have all but exorcised. By this stage, the two protagonists - an ordinary- looking suburban couple, Joan and Jeff - have experienced much grisly stabbing and smothering. But the American playwright's cut-up technique, by which the order of proceedings is seemingly determined at random, has disorientated us so much that we no longer expect fatal actions to be of any consequence.

People expect rapists to be on the loose in other cities, not here

A series of horrific rapes has shocked Bath, reports Jason Bennetto

Mother grabs back children in a Lebanon schoolyard

American woman and charity workers in dramatic airport dash

Witch hunt

Beer: Hubble, bubble ... to drink it means trouble. Some brews for Halloween

Swinging with a ghost writer

Lucy O'Brien enjoys a horror spoof

Why he never sold his soul

`Whoring out' is not what John Carpenter does. He lies low until the smoke clears and then makes another movie - that's all his own. By Nick Hasted

When your private life spills out of a cardboard bag on to the street, it's time to take stock

I have been scared of some really dumb things in my time. When I was five, my Mum took me to see Cats, but I was scared of Brian Blessed so we had to leave. The same year, I had a fabulously successful birthday party, at which I held court like a mini Joan Collins until I decided I was scared of the lighted candles on my cake. I screamed and cried and curled up beneath a table until my Montessori mates had to be sent home.

A being that works in mysterious ways

Who is to say what is a proper religion? That all-seeing judge of transcendental things, the Charity Commission
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent