News The logo of Samsung Electronics is displayed on a glass door at their headquarters in Seoul on November 6, 2013. Samsung Electronics promised better shareholder returns, dismissed fears over smartphone market saturation and signalled a more aggressive acquisitions policy Wednesday at a rare analysts' briefing to boost its flagging stock price.

Samsung has announced plans to open 60 of its own branded stores in Britain and six other European countries, in a bid to challenge Apple's successful retail store approach.

Samsung, Apple, HTC warn of squeeze

Cut-throat competition between smartphone and tablet makers will intensify in the run-up to Christmas, industry experts warned yesterday after Apple, Samsung and HTC gave cautious outlooks on their key selling season.

Samsung, Apple, HTC warn of squeeze

Cut-throat competition between smartphone and tablet makers will intensify in the run-up to Christmas, industry experts warned yesterday after Apple, Samsung and HTC gave cautious outlooks on their key selling season.

Samsung vs Apple: In a seemingly endless battle, Apple claims that Samsung ripped off its iPad tablet for the Galaxy Tab. Last week saw a US court agreeing, pulling the tablet from sale in the US

The iPad vs the Galaxy Tab: Apple loses Samsung case appeal

Apple lost a Court of Appeal battle today in its legal action over Samsung's Galaxy tablet computer.

Samsung hit by legal row

The South Korean electronics giant Samsung took a $12bn (£7.6bn) blow yesterday as investors dumped its shares in the wake of its defeat by rival Apple in a bitter US patent row.

Clone wars: Samsung's Galaxy infringed Apple's patent and design

Consumers to pay more as phone wars go nuclear

Apple wins $1bn damages from Samsung over copyright infringements, a ruling that could lead to less competition

Apple and Samsung in court battle over patent

The legal phoney war between Apple and its biggest rival in smartphones and tablet computers, Samsung, finally gave way to real courtroom hostilities yesterday, as a patent case with billions of dollars at stake got underway in Silicon Valley.

Samsung Galaxy Apple turnover

Samsung's Galaxy smartphones are outselling rival Apple's iPhones by nearly two to one, leading to record second-quarter profits for the Korean technology giant.

The judge said the Samsung
product (right) did not have the same ‘understated
simplicity’ of the iPad

Is this an iPad copy? No, says judge: it's not cool enough

Critique of Samsung's tablet might sound like an insult – but it's actually good news in latest round of patent battle with Apple

Apple's blocking move irks Samsung

Samsung Electronics yesterday said it will vigorously oppose Apple's move to block sales of the Galaxy S III smartphone in the US.

ARM thrives as it inhabits Apple's core products

Call it the iPad effect: the British designer of chips forthe Apple tablet yesterday saw its shares surge as much as 7 per cent after strong sales in the past quarter.

Shell strikes Chinese shale

The shale gas revolution spread to China yesterday as Royal Dutch Shell struck the rock-based fossil fuel while drilling, heralding the country's first commercial production.

Samsung lands blow on Apple as ban on tablet sales is overturned

Samsung has landed a significant victory in the tit-for-tat legal wranglings with Apple after a ban on sales of its tablet computers was overturned in Australia.

Apple wins patent block on Samsung

A Dutch court has awarded Apple an injunction to stop its rival Samsung from marketing three smartphone models, including its Galaxy S, after alleging a breach of patents.

'Superman' Li's Northumbrian Water tonic

The Hong Kong-based billionaire and business "superman" Li Ka-Shing has made an indicative cash offer for Northumbrian Water, the company said yesterday.

A good day to bury bad news? HSBC cuts hundreds of posts from branches

The Unite union yesterday accused HSBC of trying to bury bad news by announcing 700 job cuts on the same day as Lloyds unveiled its swingeing staff reduction plans.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent