News The logo of Samsung Electronics is displayed on a glass door at their headquarters in Seoul on November 6, 2013. Samsung Electronics promised better shareholder returns, dismissed fears over smartphone market saturation and signalled a more aggressive acquisitions policy Wednesday at a rare analysts' briefing to boost its flagging stock price.

Samsung has announced plans to open 60 of its own branded stores in Britain and six other European countries, in a bid to challenge Apple's successful retail store approach.

Letter: World's favourite?

Sir: May I make a suggestion to Robert Ayling, chief executive of the tragically under-performing British Airways? Why doesn't he go "undercover" and try flying the world's once favourite airline as an ordinary economy passenger (preferably with a couple of children in tow) on a long-haul flight. Perhaps to Australia?

Singapore Airlines profits tumble

Singapore Airlines profits tumble

Mobius attacks HSBC purchase

MARK MOBIUS, president of Templeton Emerging Markets, yesterday attacked HSBC, the UK-based banking giant, over its sale of $3bn of new shares to finance its purchase of Edmond Safra's Republic New York banking empire.

Around the World: Hong Kong

HONG KONG

Peter York on ads Number 259: Australia - An adventure with a gruesome ending

A ustralia is five big cities with a lot of nothing in between. It's hugely urbanised, and its biggest city, Sydney, gets more like San Francisco every minute. Australia has more Greeks than Bubble Central and it is always saying that its future lies in Asia, not with the old Commonwealth ties.

Asia's bosses quake before Korean Gekko

FOR MORE than a year now, the various official spokesmen for global financial sanity have been bitching and moaning about the need for Asian countries to change the way they do business. But the two most important troubled Asian economies - Japan and Korea - have been changing very slowly, or not at all. No empty CEO heads have rolled, no assets have been stripped, no stupid corporations have been raided and reformed.

HSBC chairman bows out in style

SIR William Purves bowed out as chairman of HSBC yesterday with an upbeat trading statement, delivered to shareholders at the bank's annual general meeting.

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elected Head of the Round Table or Rotary - traditional backbones of the small business sector.

Samsung abandons pounds 450m microchip investment in the North-east

Samsung, the biggest industrial conglomerate in South Korea, has postponed building the next phase of its pounds 450m electronics investment in North-east England as Korean corporations scramble to pull back from overseas expansion in the face of a crippling financial crisis. Richard Lloyd Parry in Seoul and Chris Godsmark in London report on Samsung's decision, which could cost some 2,000 jobs and further undermine confidence in the ability of Korean firms to deliver on their investment plans.

Saracen expects offer for Value Trust

Saracen expects offer for Value Trust

HSBC pours scorn on Saracen Value

HSBC pours scorn on Saracen Value

Saracen claims bid support

The letters of support for HSBC Asset Management in its bid to take over the running of the poorly performing Saracen Value Trust from SFM Investment Management were not watertight commitments, Mr Jim Fisher, the SFM director on the Saracen board claimed last night. HSBC had not yet complied with his request to show him the letter.

Samsung suffers as chip prices fall

Samsung Electronics, the world's largest computer chip manufacturer, warned yesterday that its first-half profits would tumble.

HSBC scorns speculation on bid for bank

The chairman of HSBC, Sir William Purves, poured cold water yesterday on persistent speculation that Britain's biggest financial group is poised to bid for another British bank. He said paying a premium to current market values in the high-flying sector would not be in the interests of HSBC's shareholders.

KOREAN TREASURES

T he biggest exhibition of Korean art to be staged in Britain for more than a decade has opened at the British Museum. Supported by the Samsung Foundation of Culture, Arts of Korea surveys Korean art and archaeology from the neolithic period to the 19th century. It features some 200 exhibits and covers a surface area of 400 square metres. The exhibition will run to the new millennium, when it will be replaced by a new permanent Korean Gallery at the museum.
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