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One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Running barefoot may be healthier, say scientists

Runners without shoes land more gently on the ground, avoiding impact injuries

Death of doctor who advocated beetroot as Aids remedy

South Africa's former health minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, known as "Dr Beetroot" after her dogged promotion of the vegetable, along with lemons, garlic and olive oil to treat Aids, has died aged 69.

Link between migraine and stroke

Young women who suffer from migraines with visual disturbances and who smoke and take the contraceptive pill are at a higher risk of stroke, research suggests.

Beyond analysis: Inside the minds of the world's top psychologists

From belief in God to the irresistible urge to flirt with the opposite sex, there are some human impulses that even the biggest brains in psychology are unable to explain. Here are their greatest unanswered questions

Elitist and exclusive? Well it is the Harvard range

For years, the university has been striving to shed its highbrow image. But a new clothing range may undo the hard work

Leading article: Wardrobe malfunction

The first test was to get the scholarship, the second to be initiated into the fraternity, and the third to take the degree summa cum laude. But now there is a fourth test any complete Harvard alumnus must pass: the wardrobe. Strapped for cash – because of poor returns on investments, thanks in part, no doubt, to those high-fliers who went into Wall Street – Harvard University has commissioned a clothing line, summed up in that all-American adjective "preppy". There will be button-down shirts, sports jackets with crimson button-holes, and plaid with everything, all at a very pre-crash, Gordon Gekko, price.

The American Dream? Not for all the pilgrims

Thousands returned within a few years of crossing the Atlantic, academic reveals

Robot evolution throws light on deep-sea Jurassic combat

Robots wag their tail fins and bob along like bathtub toys in a pool at a New York state college lab. Their actions are dictated by microprocessors housed in round plastic containers, the sort you'd store soup in.

Hackers leave Gates with pie on his face

You don't get anywhere in business without making some enemies along the way, as Bill Gates found today when the portal of Microsoft news website MSN in New Zealand was attacked by hackers, who rerouted visitors to an image of the Microsoft founder with pie on his face.

Jeremy Warner: Don't count on China to act as the locomotive

Outlook As expected, the big emerging- market economies of Asia are proving more resilient to the global recession than the advanced, industrialised economies of the West and Japan. But can that resilience lift the rest of the world out of its funk? This seems rather less likely.

Angeliki Laiou: Influential and highly regarded scholar of Byzantium

Angeliki Laiou was a leading historian of Byzantium's economy and society, and a pioneering woman in the international academic world and in the Greek government. She impressed first with her precocity: she obtained her PhD at Harvard at the age of 25, held various positions in American universities (Harvard itself, Brandeis, Rutgers), and was back at her alma mater as Professor of Byzantine History when she was only 40. In addition, she spent two years as an MP and was briefly Deputy Secretary of Foreign Affairs in her native Greece.

When 'bad' foods turn good

We may think we know what to avoid – but when it comes to diet, the rules are rarely that simple. By Roger Dobson

Stay the night: Mandarin Oriental Boston

The pound may continue to struggle against the dollar, but we're still up for a trip across the pond. And, in Boston, they're looking forward to hosting even more of us this year – a 9 per cent increase is predicted, which may not match last year's 12 per cent rise but is still pretty healthy in a recession.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent