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One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Running barefoot may be healthier, say scientists

Runners without shoes land more gently on the ground, avoiding impact injuries

Death of doctor who advocated beetroot as Aids remedy

South Africa's former health minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, known as "Dr Beetroot" after her dogged promotion of the vegetable, along with lemons, garlic and olive oil to treat Aids, has died aged 69.

Link between migraine and stroke

Young women who suffer from migraines with visual disturbances and who smoke and take the contraceptive pill are at a higher risk of stroke, research suggests.

Beyond analysis: Inside the minds of the world's top psychologists

From belief in God to the irresistible urge to flirt with the opposite sex, there are some human impulses that even the biggest brains in psychology are unable to explain. Here are their greatest unanswered questions

Elitist and exclusive? Well it is the Harvard range

For years, the university has been striving to shed its highbrow image. But a new clothing range may undo the hard work

Leading article: Wardrobe malfunction

The first test was to get the scholarship, the second to be initiated into the fraternity, and the third to take the degree summa cum laude. But now there is a fourth test any complete Harvard alumnus must pass: the wardrobe. Strapped for cash – because of poor returns on investments, thanks in part, no doubt, to those high-fliers who went into Wall Street – Harvard University has commissioned a clothing line, summed up in that all-American adjective "preppy". There will be button-down shirts, sports jackets with crimson button-holes, and plaid with everything, all at a very pre-crash, Gordon Gekko, price.

The American Dream? Not for all the pilgrims

Thousands returned within a few years of crossing the Atlantic, academic reveals

Robot evolution throws light on deep-sea Jurassic combat

Robots wag their tail fins and bob along like bathtub toys in a pool at a New York state college lab. Their actions are dictated by microprocessors housed in round plastic containers, the sort you'd store soup in.

Hackers leave Gates with pie on his face

You don't get anywhere in business without making some enemies along the way, as Bill Gates found today when the portal of Microsoft news website MSN in New Zealand was attacked by hackers, who rerouted visitors to an image of the Microsoft founder with pie on his face.

Jeremy Warner: Don't count on China to act as the locomotive

Outlook As expected, the big emerging- market economies of Asia are proving more resilient to the global recession than the advanced, industrialised economies of the West and Japan. But can that resilience lift the rest of the world out of its funk? This seems rather less likely.

Angeliki Laiou: Influential and highly regarded scholar of Byzantium

Angeliki Laiou was a leading historian of Byzantium's economy and society, and a pioneering woman in the international academic world and in the Greek government. She impressed first with her precocity: she obtained her PhD at Harvard at the age of 25, held various positions in American universities (Harvard itself, Brandeis, Rutgers), and was back at her alma mater as Professor of Byzantine History when she was only 40. In addition, she spent two years as an MP and was briefly Deputy Secretary of Foreign Affairs in her native Greece.

When 'bad' foods turn good

We may think we know what to avoid – but when it comes to diet, the rules are rarely that simple. By Roger Dobson

Stay the night: Mandarin Oriental Boston

The pound may continue to struggle against the dollar, but we're still up for a trip across the pond. And, in Boston, they're looking forward to hosting even more of us this year – a 9 per cent increase is predicted, which may not match last year's 12 per cent rise but is still pretty healthy in a recession.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003