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One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Athletics: Lambert's return threatens the established order

Harvard graduate looks to upstage Britain's top quartet in 200m at AAA Championships

Pioneering economist quits Cambridge

The hidden history of human evolution

Taken from a paper given to the Royal Institution by Michael Cremo, the historian of archaeology at the Bhaktivedanta Institute in America

Heart attack victims may grow new vessels

DOCTORS HAVE successfully treated coronary patients with tiny "time capsules", inserted next to the heart, which stimulated the growth of new blood vessels.

Capsules make patients grow blood vessels

DOCTORS HAVE successfully treated coronary patients with tiny "time capsules" inserted next to the heart, which stimulated the growth of new blood vessels.

`Mozart effect' divides science

A DISPUTE has broken out among psychologists over whether listening to Mozart can improve mental ability.

Obituary: Professor Burton Dreben

BURTON DREBEN'S profound understanding of philosophy and the development of mathematical logic was conveyed in a relatively small number of publications, and in his enormous creative influence on the work of others. He also played a key role in maintaining and developing Harvard University's pre-eminence in research and in guiding the university through the political unrest of the late Sixties and early Seventies.

Obituary: Professor W. Jackson Bate

W. JACKSON BATE stands as one of the leading biographers and humanists of the 20th century. His John Keats (1963) and Samuel Johnson (1977) remain standard, authoritative, and popular. Both attracted the highest scholarly accolades. He received the Pulitzer Prize for each, an award until then given exclusively to biographers of American subjects. The Johnson study received the National Book Award and the National Book Critics' Circle Award.

Philistines had good taste

FAR FROM being the uncivilised brutes of history who did not care about culture, the Philistines had a taste for fine wines, delicate oils and decorative crockery.

Britain falls behind

Charles Piggott hears a call for the UK to re-invent itself or lose more ground to foreign rivals

Rehearsing to be an entrepreneur

Some of the most successful are sullen, near-teenage misfits in T-shirts and sneakers
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Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness