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One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Athletics: Lambert's return threatens the established order

Harvard graduate looks to upstage Britain's top quartet in 200m at AAA Championships

Pioneering economist quits Cambridge

The hidden history of human evolution

Taken from a paper given to the Royal Institution by Michael Cremo, the historian of archaeology at the Bhaktivedanta Institute in America

Heart attack victims may grow new vessels

DOCTORS HAVE successfully treated coronary patients with tiny "time capsules", inserted next to the heart, which stimulated the growth of new blood vessels.

Capsules make patients grow blood vessels

DOCTORS HAVE successfully treated coronary patients with tiny "time capsules" inserted next to the heart, which stimulated the growth of new blood vessels.

`Mozart effect' divides science

A DISPUTE has broken out among psychologists over whether listening to Mozart can improve mental ability.

Obituary: Professor Burton Dreben

BURTON DREBEN'S profound understanding of philosophy and the development of mathematical logic was conveyed in a relatively small number of publications, and in his enormous creative influence on the work of others. He also played a key role in maintaining and developing Harvard University's pre-eminence in research and in guiding the university through the political unrest of the late Sixties and early Seventies.

Obituary: Professor W. Jackson Bate

W. JACKSON BATE stands as one of the leading biographers and humanists of the 20th century. His John Keats (1963) and Samuel Johnson (1977) remain standard, authoritative, and popular. Both attracted the highest scholarly accolades. He received the Pulitzer Prize for each, an award until then given exclusively to biographers of American subjects. The Johnson study received the National Book Award and the National Book Critics' Circle Award.

Philistines had good taste

FAR FROM being the uncivilised brutes of history who did not care about culture, the Philistines had a taste for fine wines, delicate oils and decorative crockery.

Britain falls behind

Charles Piggott hears a call for the UK to re-invent itself or lose more ground to foreign rivals

Rehearsing to be an entrepreneur

Some of the most successful are sullen, near-teenage misfits in T-shirts and sneakers
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence