News

One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Obituary: Dame Isabel Graham Bryce

It was for her work on the Oxford Regional Hospital Board (1963- 72) and also for her chairmanship of the National Nursing Staff Committee (1967-75) that Isabel Graham Bryce was, in 1968, appointed DBE. In her long working life, she set herself goals which were beyond mere personal ambition: she took an intense and genuine interest in the welfare of others, high and low, and she applied a systematic approach - derived, no doubt, from her early scientific training - to achieve what she saw as right and fitting.

How to gain balance

Companies are yearning for better ways to decide strategy. Roger Trapp treads the path to the wider perspective

Study links passive smoking with coronary problems

A ground-breaking study by researchers at Harvard University has found that regular exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke will almost double a person's risk of having a heart attack.

The big boys' blood money

An American company is selling the right to use stem cells - vital components in the fight against blood disorders. What's wrong with that? Plenty, say scientists who plan to block the enterprise. By Charles Arthur

The very latest way to have a baby by mistake

Long ago it was crocodile dung. Yesterday, it was the Pill. Today, Persona. Glenda Cooper on the quest for a perfect contraceptive

Student hanged herself before finals

A brilliant Oxford University student used a cord to hang herself just weeks before she was due to take her final exams, an inquest heard yesterday.

Letter: At risk of baffling everyone

One reason why experts and the public disagree about what is risky is that experts focus on objective measurables such as mortality rates while the public also give weight to what is novel, dreaded or seen as uncontrollable (Lewis Wolpert, Review, 6 April). Arguably, therefore, the public has a richer concept of risk. Am I irrational to fear what is new or horrible or out of control more than what is established, accepted and understood?

Gross natural products

Richard Davenport-Hines defines the yuck factor

Tiny machines will be able to build themselves

How do you build a micro-machine whose components are thousands of times smaller than a pinhead? The answer, according to American scientists, is that you don't - you let them build themselves.

Confessions of a company 'lifer'

THE MONDAY INTERVIEW Gordon Campbell : Head of Courtaulds talks to Tom Stevenson

How to be smarter with the same brain

Early intensive education can increase a child's IQ by 30 points, say proponents of accelerated learning. Maureen O'Connor reports

Not up to scratch

Liz Hodgkinson tried vitamins, creams and minerals on her problem nails. She finally found a remedy at the beauty salon

The day Elvis was all shook up

Stephen Brenkley tells the heartbreak of a cox for whom the perfect stage was set

Lizard puts man in the shade with ability to walk on water

Walking on water is scientifically possible, two American researchers have established, but only lizards can do it - and the lizards are really walking on air.

Jury still out on benefits of coffee

Women who drink coffee are less likely to commit suicide than those who do not, suggests a study published today. But the author says the results may not be significant, because doctors might have told depressed patients not to drink coffee, a factor that was not studied.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?