News

One of Britain's biggest technology success stories, Blinkx, saw its shares collapse by as much as 50 per cent yesterday after it was accused by a Harvard professor of "sneaking on to users' computers and defrauding advertisers".

Obituary: Dame Isabel Graham Bryce

It was for her work on the Oxford Regional Hospital Board (1963- 72) and also for her chairmanship of the National Nursing Staff Committee (1967-75) that Isabel Graham Bryce was, in 1968, appointed DBE. In her long working life, she set herself goals which were beyond mere personal ambition: she took an intense and genuine interest in the welfare of others, high and low, and she applied a systematic approach - derived, no doubt, from her early scientific training - to achieve what she saw as right and fitting.

How to gain balance

Companies are yearning for better ways to decide strategy. Roger Trapp treads the path to the wider perspective

Study links passive smoking with coronary problems

A ground-breaking study by researchers at Harvard University has found that regular exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke will almost double a person's risk of having a heart attack.

The big boys' blood money

An American company is selling the right to use stem cells - vital components in the fight against blood disorders. What's wrong with that? Plenty, say scientists who plan to block the enterprise. By Charles Arthur

The very latest way to have a baby by mistake

Long ago it was crocodile dung. Yesterday, it was the Pill. Today, Persona. Glenda Cooper on the quest for a perfect contraceptive

Student hanged herself before finals

A brilliant Oxford University student used a cord to hang herself just weeks before she was due to take her final exams, an inquest heard yesterday.

Letter: At risk of baffling everyone

One reason why experts and the public disagree about what is risky is that experts focus on objective measurables such as mortality rates while the public also give weight to what is novel, dreaded or seen as uncontrollable (Lewis Wolpert, Review, 6 April). Arguably, therefore, the public has a richer concept of risk. Am I irrational to fear what is new or horrible or out of control more than what is established, accepted and understood?

Gross natural products

Richard Davenport-Hines defines the yuck factor

Tiny machines will be able to build themselves

How do you build a micro-machine whose components are thousands of times smaller than a pinhead? The answer, according to American scientists, is that you don't - you let them build themselves.

Confessions of a company 'lifer'

THE MONDAY INTERVIEW Gordon Campbell : Head of Courtaulds talks to Tom Stevenson

How to be smarter with the same brain

Early intensive education can increase a child's IQ by 30 points, say proponents of accelerated learning. Maureen O'Connor reports

Not up to scratch

Liz Hodgkinson tried vitamins, creams and minerals on her problem nails. She finally found a remedy at the beauty salon

The day Elvis was all shook up

Stephen Brenkley tells the heartbreak of a cox for whom the perfect stage was set

Lizard puts man in the shade with ability to walk on water

Walking on water is scientifically possible, two American researchers have established, but only lizards can do it - and the lizards are really walking on air.

Jury still out on benefits of coffee

Women who drink coffee are less likely to commit suicide than those who do not, suggests a study published today. But the author says the results may not be significant, because doctors might have told depressed patients not to drink coffee, a factor that was not studied.
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve