Sport Times Up, left, ridden by Ryan Moore, wins the Speedy Services Doncaster Cup, at Doncaster yesterday

Trainer seeks fourth winner in the Classic in seven years but Talent could upset favourite

Simon Calder: An open door for a Cuban stowaway

Travel is all to do with doors: exploring what lies beyond them. For journeys in Latin America, though, the Spanish word puerta is a better term: it covers a multitude of openings, from the creaky old door of the Hotel Caribbean in the Cuban capital, to the Gate of the Sun that invites weary hikers on the Inca Trail to marvel at, then descend to, Machu Picchu.

There's more to this Caribbean island than the beach

See Cuba before it changes, that's the mantra. Alison Shepherd wanted her whole family to experience the place

Album: Various artists, Gilles Peterson Presents Havana Cultura (Brownswood)

An odd one this: CD one is a bunch of new recordings featuring the Cuban pianist Roberto Fonseca, produced by Peterson, while CD two features the global DJ's current favourite Cuban grooves.

The Tropicana: Seventy and still clubbing

Since it opened in 1940, Cuba's legendary nightspot has hosted Mafia dons, Hollywood stars and Soviet leaders

City slicker in Havana

The pace of change in Cuba is speeding up, so visit soon. Lydia Bell offers a guide for new and returning visitors

Album: Various Artists, Gilles Peterson Presents Havana Cultura (Brownswood Recordings)

It may be subtitled New Cuba Sound, but Havana Cultura demonstrates how the American economic blockade of Cuba still exerts an equivalent isolation on the island's musical development.

24-Hour Room Service: Hotel Saratoga, Havana, Cuba

Modern glamour, Cuban style

Juan Almeida Bosque: Cuban vice-president who fought alongside Castro and Guevara

When Fidel Castro, Ché Guevara and a ragtag band of revolutionaries trundled victoriously into Havana on 8 January 1959, Juan Almeida's was the only black face at the head of their convoy. To the majority of the Cuban capital's residents – poor, black or mulatto (mixed race) – the sight of a black man in one of the leading jeeps was a comforting signal that the revolution would finally give them a voice.

Cuba: what everyone needs to know, By Julia E Sweig

Apart from the blind spot Sweig shares with all political scientists – a refusal to take the arts seriously, especially culpable in Cuba's case – this lucid Q&A-style survey more or less lives up to its subtitle.

Hollywood rediscovers rum, music and the magic of Havana

Big acting names travel to Cuban capital amid signs of thaw

Cubans clamour for Royal Ballet tickets

First tour in 78-year history sells out in hours

Travel Challenge: A beach holiday for singles outside the euro-zone

Every week, we invite competing companies to give us their best deal for a particular holiday. Today: a one-week beach holiday outside the euro-zone, for single travellers. Prices are for departures in the first week of August in a double room for single occupancy, for seven nights.

American states lift 47-year ban as Cuba comes in from the cold

In a turning point for the entire region, foreign ministers of the Organisation of American States have agreed to lift a 47-year-old rule banning Cuba from their ranks, dating back to President John F Kennedy and the Cold War.

All Names Have Been Changed, By Claire Kilroy

Following in the footsteps of Donna Tartt, Claire Kilroy's third novel is a campus drama rich in arcane references and enigmatic happenings. Set in 1980s Dublin, the novel revolves around a group of mature creative-writing students and their volatile relationship with their tutor, the literary giant PJ Glynn.

US, Cuba agree to resume migration talks

The United States and Cuba have agreed to resume direct talks on migration, last held in 2003, and open discussions on establishing direct mail service between the two countries, a US official said today.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003