Sport Times Up, left, ridden by Ryan Moore, wins the Speedy Services Doncaster Cup, at Doncaster yesterday

Trainer seeks fourth winner in the Classic in seven years but Talent could upset favourite

Leonardo Padura's revolution in crime

With his Havana Quartet of mysteries, Padura turned Cuba's history into gripping and atmospheric fiction. Jane Jakeman meets the boy from the barrio

Cuba's new Castro shows little patience with 'Women in White'

Cuba's "Women in White" who staged a street protest in Havana to demand the release of their dissident husbands discovered they can expect no gentler treatment from the two-month-old government of Raul Castro than they could from that of his brother, Fidel. Ten women from the group were roughed up by a crowd of government supporters who outnumbered them 10 to one, and were thrown into a bus and driven home.

Fidel's successor gives Cubans the freedom to watch foreign television

After decades of being browbeaten by Communist state-run television, a new 24-hour channel with foreign content is being offered to Cuba's television viewers, many of whom were so bored they had turned off their sets years ago.

Israel 'Cachao' Lopez: Bassist and pioneer of mambo

The bassist and composer Israel López played a leading role in the evolution of Latin music, successively nurturing both the mambo and the improvised Cuban form known as the descarga, and paving the way for the international phenomenon that is salsa. Known invariably by the nickname "Cachao", he was, too, an innovative arranger; one who successfully synthesised his own country's musical traditions with those emanating from the American mainland to create an alluring sound which continues to seduce those who encounter it.

In Havana, even the future is very carefully stage-managed

Fidel Castro continued his long farewell to the Cuban people yesterday when state television prepared to broadcast an unprecedented, but carefully scripted discussion about the road ahead, now that the "Commander in Chief" has finally loosened his tenacious grip on power.

On the streets of Havana, surprise and disbelief as the news spread

The people of Havana were finding it difficult to imagine life without Fidel yesterday. Few of those on their way to work in the early hours were even aware of the news on the front pages of Cuba's official newspapers.

I shook hands – then sat through a nine-hour speech

Late in 1979, while working as a researcher in the Labour Party's international department, I met Fidel Castro.

Tata Guines: Cuban 'King of the Congas'

Tata Güines was one of the finest, most original and best-loved percussionists in the history of Cuban music, whose rousing playing made him a celebrity for followers of both jazz and then world music, in a remarkable career that lasted for six decades. He specialised in playing the conga drums, the tall, barrel-like instruments that had originally been brought to Cuba by African slaves, and which brought Güines his inevitable nickname, "King of the Congas".

Rowing: British exploit home help

The home-crowd effect is already lifting the British team at the World Championships. Members of the men's eight and women's quad both cited the incentive of competing on home water to enhance performance, even if there are fewer spectators early in the week than there will be at the weekend's finals.

A whole new vista

Cuban music continues to evolve and thrill the world. Phil Sweeney in Havana savours the new wave of local bands

PsychoGeography #59: A marriage made in Greeneland

I went to a wedding at the weekend in Havana ... in Brighton. Let us just dwell on that phrase for a few moments: I went to a wedding at the weekend in Havana ... in Brighton.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003