Nature Club: From badgers to blackberries, readers report on their recent wildlife highlights

A family of badgers – two adults and three young – visit my garden. I've taken pictures, but they are so shy they disappear at the slightest sound. The female is the one with the mottled nose. When badgers fight, they often grab their opponent's nose and bite. The pinkish colouring is scar tissue from battles.

The world in award-winning images: The Insight / IoS Travel Photography Competition

BA steward Steve McDonald will see more than airports with his first prize: a £3,000 commission from Insight

Wasps unveil stadium plans

Wasps have unveiled Wycombe Air Park at Booker, just outside High Wycombe, as their preferred site for a new 17,500-20,000 stadium.

Libel court 'is not the right place for faith disputes'

One of Britain's most senior judges said yesterday that libel courts must not become places where religious and doctrinal differences are hammered out.

Wasps threatened with winding-up order over unpaid taxes of £1m

Wasps, one of the great names in world rugby and among the most successful Premiership teams of the professional era, have been threatened with a winding-up order from the tax authorities over unpaid sums totalling more than £1m – a quarter of their officially sanctioned playing budget. The warning of action by HM Revenue and Customs was issued earlier this month and club officials are now discussing ways of clearing the debt as quickly as possible.

Saracens and Saints settle Tonga'uiha dispute

Northampton and Saracens, the two clubs involved in an amusingly fractious spat over the services of the Pacific Islands prop Soane Tonga'uiha, yesterday reached an "amicable" agreement that allows the player to remain with the Midlanders next season – and, indeed, for the two seasons after that. Given that Tonga'uiha had pledged himself to Saracens, and that the Watford-based club subsequently accused their rivals of showing "complete contempt for justice and integrity", it may not have been as amicable as all that. We will find out when the two clubs meet at Franklin's Gardens a week tomorrow.

Cannabis smuggling gang facing jail

Members of Britain's largest skunk cannabis smuggling ring carried holdalls stuffed with hundreds of thousands of pounds in cash to launder at a foreign exchange, a court heard today.

Bucks New University goes into business with industry

When Richard Galt returned from Japan a year ago, he resolved to break into advertising. So, he applied to JWT for a traineeship. They said the 25-year-old would make a good "creative" or "planner" but that first he needed to do a Master's course at Buckinghamshire New University.

£62m cannabis-smuggling gang facing jail

A gang believed to be Britain's most prolific importers of skunk cannabis were facing jail today.

Father who attacked intruder walks free

A businessman jailed for seriously injuring an intruder after the lives of his family were threatened by knife-wielding burglars in their home was shown "mercy" and freed by senior judges today.

Mark Steel: Here is the news: a snowflake has fallen in High Wycombe...

Even the financial news has been about the weather's impact on business

Britain's gritters: 'We've had to get used to the abuse'

A Slice of Britain: They are working flat out in appalling conditions, desperately trying to keep the traffic moving through the ice. But they aren't working fast enough for the public, and the salt is running low...

Carola Long: Why can't all shops be like John Lewis?

Bargain prices have lowered our expectations of good service

Business Diary: 23/12/2009

John Lewis staff put in the extra hours

So this is how John Lewis is achieving those stonking sales figures it has been boasting about of late. Staff at its High Wycombe branch actually spent Monday night sleeping in the store.

Johnson sympathetic to jailed brothers

Home Secretary says he is 'uncomfortable' at sentence for burglary victims
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent