The Week in Radio: Jazz man Soweto Kinch's city tour captured Birmingham's inner beauty

A documentary on Birmingham? Thanks but no thanks, I thought to myself while pondering the new series of Reimagining the City. Seriously, Birmingham? It's hardly Florence or Cairo or Cape Town. No one nudges their partner on a soggy January morning and says wistfully, "Darling, wouldn't it be just lovely if we could leave all this behind and disappear to Birmingham?"

Back in the black: vice-chancellor Professor Malcolm Gillies says there is now a glimmer of light

London Metropolitan University has restored its finances and reputation - but at a price

The university has had a wretched time of late, being hit by a £36.5m fine and stripped of the right to sponsor students from outside the EU

Marshall moved to New York in 1981, where he had latterly painted murals

Austin John Marshall: Graphic artist, record producer and songwriter who played a key role in the folk revival of the 1960s

Austin John Marshall, record producer, folk-revival ideas man, lyricist and songwriter, performance poet and muralist, created, nurtured or acted as cultural midwife to many strands of art. His fingerprints are all over Shirley Collins & Davy Graham's folk roots, new routes, Shirley & Dolly Collins' magnum opus Anthems in Eden, Ultravox!'s pre-Midge Ure incarnation Tiger Lily and English songwriter Steve Ashley's groundbreaking Stroll On. He also contributed footage to Peter Neal's Jimi Hendrix film Rainbow Bridge (1972) and to the Incredible String Band's film Be Glad for the Song Has No Ending (1970).

job

Data reveals six NHS trusts with 'persistently' high death rates

Six NHS trusts have “persistently” high death rates for patients who die in hospital or within 30 days of discharge, according to new data.

Amanda Knox in Seattle, US. Ms Knox is not expected to return to Italy for the trial

Awaiting a verdict from afar: Retrial of Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito set to reach decision over the murder of Meredith Kercher

Neither of the former lovers are expected to be in the court in Florence, but if found guilty again, another appeal is bound to follow

President Obama urged members of Congress to make 2014 a 'year of action' in his State of the Union address

State of the Union: Obama’s not the only elected leader whose power is waning

Institutional flaws have held the President back

You say lateral frontal pole, I say that little devil/angel that whispers in my ear

Without recognising it, Oxford scientists appear to have located the consience

Missing York student Megan Roberts likely to have fallen in river while drunk, say police

Police searching for missing Megan Roberts have said the most probable scenario is that she "entered the river" while "heavily affected by alcohol".

Political protests and lifelong friendships, but barely a Pharaoh in sight: A year abroad in Egypt

For some language courses, a year in Paris is usual. But if you're reading Arabic, you have to travel a little further afield, as Rosie Collington found out

Students outraged as Yale fraternity suspended for 'no means yes' chants establishes chapter at Edinburgh

George W Bush was once president of controversial Delta Kappa Epsilon

'Psychometric tests' landed Co-op Bank job for Paul Flowers

The Co-operative Bank's disgraced former chairman, Paul Flowers, apparently won the job because he beat his rivals' psychometric test scores, MPs on the Treasury Committee have been told.

NHS staff took an average 9.5 days of sick leave in 2012/13

NHS failing in its duty to look after the health of its staff, doctors say

The NHS in England is not doing enough to look after the health of its staff, doctors have warned, as a report found that nearly half of NHS trusts do not have a mental wellbeing policy in place for their employees.

Emergency services were called to 25 Bank Street at around 8am this morning

JP Morgan employee who fell to death from bank's London office in Canary Wharf named as Gabriel Magee

Gabriel joined JPMorgan in 2004 and worked in technology. He was not a trader or a banker.

The new guidance applies to England's primary and secondary schools

Schools to publish what they teach children about sex, drugs and alcohol

Move will 'address changes in technology and legislation since 2000'

Helen Zille (right), leader of the Democratic Alliance, is hugged by Mamphela Ramphele at the Cape Town conference

South Africa elections: Opposition parties unite to challenge ruling ANC

South Africa’s main opposition party has merged with a smaller group to jointly challenge the ruling ANC in elections in April.

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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003