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Gardeners have a habit of going on about their planting disasters, instead of celebrating their successes, says our green-fingered correspondent...

The Big Six: Himalayan Retreats

Thousands protest killing in Indian-held Kashmir

Thousands of angry villagers blocked a key highway in Indian-administered Kashmir today, accusing the army of killing a young man in custody.

Brazil set to enshrine the right to find happiness

In a nation known for its jubilant spirit, massive parties and seemingly intrinsic ability to celebrate anything under the sun, is a constitutional amendment really required to protect the pursuit of happiness?

All aboard the river mild: White-water rafting in the wilds of Nepal doesn't have to be terrifying

"Does this rapid have a name?" I asked, not entirely convinced I wanted to know the answer. A smile spread across my rafting guide's face as the foaming white water approached. "This one," he said, "is too insignificant."

Peak district: Anna Pavord came across plenty of magnificent flora on her recent trip to the Himalayas

Almost as soon as we got back from our Himalayan journey last autumn, I began planning the next one. Friends suppose I must be going for the plants, and certainly there is no shortage: pleione orchids plastering rocky banks along the tracks, tall sheaves of deep pink Arundina graminifolia on the grass slopes. That's not an orchid I've ever seen in cultivation in Britain, but the general effect is rather like magenta-coloured Gladiolus byzantinus.

Whatever the weather: Why the seasons always blow hot and cold in Delhi

If there's one aspect of the Indian weather that most people have heard about, it's the monsoon rains that drench parts of southern Asia between June and September.

Pupils lead Tibet protests

Thousands of Tibetan schoolchildren have taken to the streets in western China to protest against being forced to take lessons in Mandarin Chinese, a move they say is an attempt to stifle their way of life.

Book Of A Lifetime: Coronation Everest by James Morris

Of course, the jacket today would be quite unacceptable. Simple, pale blue, elegant in the way all Faber jackets have always been – and dominated by a photograph of a splendidly bearded old man, tribally decked out in some turbaned Himalayan fashion, reading a copy of 'The Times'. But then you look more closely, and realise that the unfortunate man is reading what cannot possibly be read, since what he is seeing is the front page turned quite upside down! What a capital joke! We tricked the old devil! Poor heathen fellow.

The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest, By Mark MacKenzie

On 8 June 1924, George Mallory and Sandy Irvine went missing on Mount Everest, within striking distance of the top. In 1999, American climber Conrad Anker came across Mallory's body, preserved in the ice, but the mystery remained tantalisingly intact: had the mountaineer reached the peak before he died?

IPCC feels the heat as it is told to get its facts right about global warming

The powerful international body set up to advise governments on the effects of global warming needs a major overhaul if it is not to repeat errors that damaged its credibility and gave succour to climate change sceptics, an independent investigation has concluded.

Everest team forced to leave sick British climber to die

At one o'clock in the afternoon, the British climber Peter Kinloch was on the roof of the world, in bright sunlight, taking photographs of the Himalayas below, "elated, cheery and bubbly".

No room at the top in Everest rush hour

It's peak season on the world's highest mountain, and purists are fed up with the crowds of glory-seekers

Bonita Norris is youngest British woman to climb Everest

A 22-year-old woman has realised her "crazy" dream after becoming the youngest British female to reach the summit of Mount Everest, it was announced today.

Did this woman really scale all 14 of the world's tallest peaks?

Korean claims mountaineering record – but her rivals say she missed one out

A different world view: A trek through the valleys of Bhutan reveals the kingdom's unspoilt charms

To my right, a man sat with shaven head and full-length earth-red robes; to my left sat a woman, shaved and dressed the same. I look ahead and then to the back of the Airbus A319. Apart from our party of 10, the plane was packed with pilgrims returning from a two-week Buddhist retreat in Kathmandu. We all shared a destination, however: the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. This small nugget of largely forested, mountainous land lies sandwiched between China and India, and recently became democratic.

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz