Voices

India is the fourth most dangerous place in the world for females, after only Afghanistan, Congo and Pakistan

Hindu rites for lesbian wedding

A lawyer and a university professor from the United States celebrated Nepal's first public lesbian wedding ceremony yesterday, after the Himalayan nation began recognising gay rights and drafting laws to end sexual discrimination.

Hindus reclaim 5,000 years of history

By restoring temples in the Muslim region of Kashmir, the Pandit community is also preserving its past. Andrew Buncombe reports

Does God belong in the classroom?

Faith schools applying for 'free' status are one of Michael Gove's biggest headaches. In part two of his series, Richard Garner wonders how these institutions square with the Government's plans for multiculturalism

Saraswati Park, By Anjali Joseph

Welcome to Bombay, the city where not enough happens

In pictures: Hindu festival of colours

Hindus in India celebrate Lath mar Holi, the festival of colour heralding Spring, by covering themselves in bright pigments.

A Day That Shook The World: India and Pakistan gain independence

On 14 August 1947, British rule on the subcontinent finally came to an end, after 163 years of the Raj.

Death sentences for India train massacre group

Eleven Muslims have been sentenced to death for starting a train fire that killed 60 Hindu nationalists and triggered one of India's worst outbursts of religious violence.

Arson verdict revives bitter conflict over train deaths that sparked riots

Muslim mob blamed for fire that incited Indian unrest killing 1,000

The Folded Earth, By Anuradha Roy

This is the kind of novel about India that cultivated people in the West, particularly Britain, love to read. It is set in a refreshingly recognisable – Tolkien-like map embedded – but not overtly familiar part of India. It has hill stations and mountain people, once so loved by Kipling and co; it has beautiful echoes of the Raj and leftover princelings; it has pickle factories and Jim Corbett; it is even haunted by the ghosts of the Mountbattens and the love letters that purportedly passed between Edwina and Nehru, surely a matter of perennial fascination only to complementary classes in India and England.

No courting in public, Hindu group warns Delhi

Lovers in Delhi could find their date plagued by a sense of unease tomorrow, after Hindu extremists threatened to film covertly and upload footage of unmarried couples seen kissing in public.

Cedilla, By Adam Mars-Jones

To recap, then. Adam Mars-Jones, twice named one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists, despite never having produced anything reaching even 200 pages, suddenly published, in 2008, Pilcrow. This was the story of John Cromer, a cheery, inquisitive lad of the 1950s growing up with Still's Disease, an arthritic condition which, mistreated, leaves him physically stilted and bed-bound. It was, at over 500 pages, indisputably a novel; more than that, it was the first part of a trilogy. Not quite a case of three buses coming all at once, but at least we had the schedule.

Video: Over 100 dead in Indian stampede

102 Hindu pilgrims are crushed to death following a bus crash in Kerala state.

Hindu holy man reveals truth of terror attacks blamed on Muslims

India is being forced to confront disturbing evidence that increasingly suggests a secret Hindu terror network may have been responsible for a wave of deadly attacks previously blamed on radical Muslims.

Murder of Anni Dewani: The bridegroom's story

The family of the man accused of having his bride killed say they find the logic of the police case incredible

Rajasthan: The cities of blue, pink and gold

In a nation that celebrates colour like no other, Rajasthan takes the spectrum to extremes. The cities of blue, pink and gold are just the start of the 'Land of Kings'
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?