Voices

India is the fourth most dangerous place in the world for females, after only Afghanistan, Congo and Pakistan

Hindu rites for lesbian wedding

A lawyer and a university professor from the United States celebrated Nepal's first public lesbian wedding ceremony yesterday, after the Himalayan nation began recognising gay rights and drafting laws to end sexual discrimination.

Hindus reclaim 5,000 years of history

By restoring temples in the Muslim region of Kashmir, the Pandit community is also preserving its past. Andrew Buncombe reports

Does God belong in the classroom?

Faith schools applying for 'free' status are one of Michael Gove's biggest headaches. In part two of his series, Richard Garner wonders how these institutions square with the Government's plans for multiculturalism

Saraswati Park, By Anjali Joseph

Welcome to Bombay, the city where not enough happens

In pictures: Hindu festival of colours

Hindus in India celebrate Lath mar Holi, the festival of colour heralding Spring, by covering themselves in bright pigments.

A Day That Shook The World: India and Pakistan gain independence

On 14 August 1947, British rule on the subcontinent finally came to an end, after 163 years of the Raj.

Death sentences for India train massacre group

Eleven Muslims have been sentenced to death for starting a train fire that killed 60 Hindu nationalists and triggered one of India's worst outbursts of religious violence.

Arson verdict revives bitter conflict over train deaths that sparked riots

Muslim mob blamed for fire that incited Indian unrest killing 1,000

The Folded Earth, By Anuradha Roy

This is the kind of novel about India that cultivated people in the West, particularly Britain, love to read. It is set in a refreshingly recognisable – Tolkien-like map embedded – but not overtly familiar part of India. It has hill stations and mountain people, once so loved by Kipling and co; it has beautiful echoes of the Raj and leftover princelings; it has pickle factories and Jim Corbett; it is even haunted by the ghosts of the Mountbattens and the love letters that purportedly passed between Edwina and Nehru, surely a matter of perennial fascination only to complementary classes in India and England.

No courting in public, Hindu group warns Delhi

Lovers in Delhi could find their date plagued by a sense of unease tomorrow, after Hindu extremists threatened to film covertly and upload footage of unmarried couples seen kissing in public.

Cedilla, By Adam Mars-Jones

To recap, then. Adam Mars-Jones, twice named one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists, despite never having produced anything reaching even 200 pages, suddenly published, in 2008, Pilcrow. This was the story of John Cromer, a cheery, inquisitive lad of the 1950s growing up with Still's Disease, an arthritic condition which, mistreated, leaves him physically stilted and bed-bound. It was, at over 500 pages, indisputably a novel; more than that, it was the first part of a trilogy. Not quite a case of three buses coming all at once, but at least we had the schedule.

Video: Over 100 dead in Indian stampede

102 Hindu pilgrims are crushed to death following a bus crash in Kerala state.

Hindu holy man reveals truth of terror attacks blamed on Muslims

India is being forced to confront disturbing evidence that increasingly suggests a secret Hindu terror network may have been responsible for a wave of deadly attacks previously blamed on radical Muslims.

Murder of Anni Dewani: The bridegroom's story

The family of the man accused of having his bride killed say they find the logic of the police case incredible

Rajasthan: The cities of blue, pink and gold

In a nation that celebrates colour like no other, Rajasthan takes the spectrum to extremes. The cities of blue, pink and gold are just the start of the 'Land of Kings'
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee