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At least 17 migrants from Haiti died on Wednesday when their overloaded sailboat capsized as it was being towed to shore in the Turks and Caicos Islands, officials in the British territory said.

Haitians wait in tents for a recovery that has still barely begun

Billions were promised after the January earthquake. Six months on, little has changed, reports Guy Adams

Sex, death and slaves: Welcome to Haiti's horror carnival

Blood and black magic flow through Haiti's history – as photographer Leah Gordon discovered when she went to Mardi Gras in the port town of Jacmel...

UN says 1.5 million people still homeless in Haiti

The UN's humanitarian chief acknowledged frustration yesterday with the slow progress in providing shelter to the 1.5 million Haitians still homeless because of the 12 January earthquake, and said a large amount of work needs to be done as the hurricane season bears down.

American freed after Haiti orphan saga

The last of 10 Americans detained while trying to take 33 children out of Haiti after the January earthquake has been freed after a judge convicted her but sentenced her to time already served in jail.

Haiti turns against leader who stayed on too long

Police were keeping watch over the Haitian capital yesterday as an uneasy calm descended on streets still littered with debris following protests by opposition groups calling for the resignation of the country's President, René Préval.

US troops will leave Haiti by 1 June

The US military mobilisation in support of Haitian earthquake relief and recovery efforts is winding down and will be concluded for the most part by 1 June, the American army said yesterday. The deputy chief of US Southern Command, Lieutenant- General Ken Keen, says there are about 2,200 American troops still there, compared to 22,000 at the peak of the US effort. And he says that, by June, only about 500 National Guard and Reserve personnel will be stationed in Haiti to help aid workers. The 12 January earthquake was estimated to have killed as many as 250,000 people.

Barbara Stocking: New beginnings in Haiti

The statues of Haiti’s heroes who led the slave revolt centuries ago are no longer visible.

Paul Collier: The crisis in Haiti shows we need a new approach to NGOs

A hybrid agency run by government and donors could better direct aid

Aid groups enlist Google to help in Haiti effort

Aid workers, with the help of Google Earth, are uploading key information onto the Web to illustrate the needs of hundreds of thousands of people left homeless by Haiti's earthquake - an innovation that could significantly boost the ability to respond to future disasters.

Leading article: The lessons of Haiti's plight

The only surprise about the UN's appeal yesterday for $1.4bn – its highest ever humanitarian call – is that it is in fact so little. Haiti stands as the worst natural catastrophe this century in terms of lives lost (230,000), those injured (300,000) and the number made homeless (1.2 million).

Judge in Haiti frees eight accused of kidnapping

A Haitian judge said yesterday that he would order the release of eight of 10 American missionaries accused of kidnapping children. Laura Silsby, the group's leader, and Charisa Coulter were being detained, investigating judge Bernard Sainvil said.

Sarkozy to take reconstruction plan to Haiti

President Nicolas Sarkozy is bringing a French plan to rebuild Haiti with him on Wednesday's visit to the Caribbean country, a trip officials hope will usher in a new era between France and its former colony.

Haiti pauses to catch its breath and remember

One month on from the devastating quake, thousands join memorial services

Judge backs release of missionaries in Haiti

A Haitian judge said yesterday he had ruled in favour of the release of 10 US missionaries accused of kidnapping 33 children and trying to take them out of the earthquake-stricken country.

Unicef chief concerned about child trafficking in Haiti

The head of Unicef warned that people may still be trying to smuggle children out of Haiti and said protecting youngsters who survived the earthquake is the top concern of the UN children's agency.

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