Arts and Entertainment 'Misha' was found to be a fraud by a woman who was not even Jewish.

Misha Defonseca claimed she killed a Nazi soldier and lived with wolves

Vardimon's multimedia epic '7734' bridges cultural divides

Jewish artists who present Wagner's operas can have a tough time – from Jews who remember the Holocaust, and from their own consciences. But for Israeli choreographer Jasmin Vardimon – now animating Covent Garden's production of Wagner's Tannhäuser – this ethical wrestle is nothing new.

The Philosopher of Auschwitz, By Irène Heidelberger-Leonard, trans. Anthea Bell

Jean Améry had always wanted to be someone extraordinary. Yet when he became just that, lauded by post-war writers, from Heinrich Böll to Alain Robbe-Grillet, Ernst Bloch to Günter Grass, Alfred Andersch to Ingeborg Bachmann, he still felt he had not achieved enough. He was the darling of the German media. Prizes and honours were raining down: from Switzerland, which had provided him with a living, working relentlessly hard, as a journalist and critic after his survival of the concentration camps; from Germany, the land not only of thinkers and high culture, but also of perpetrators, where he had not set foot during the intervening years; and even from Austria, from which he had been hunted "like a hare" in 1938, but where he returned to take his own life in 1978.

New online database lists Nazi loot for repatriation

More than 20,000 pieces of art stolen by the Nazis during World War Two can now be searched in an online catalogue for Holocaust survivors and their relatives to reclaim.

Eileen Nearne: Secret agent with the Special Operations Executive who survived torture by the Gestapo

Eileen Nearne was a war heroine who, despatched to France as a secret agent during the Second World War, died decades later in obscurity having survived Gestapo torture and a Nazi concentration camp.

Primo Levi's Auschwitz survivor 'Pikolo' dies

For decades Jean Samuel chose never to discuss his wartime experiences as an Auschwitz survivor. Living quietly as a local pharmacist, a post he inherited from his father in a small Alsace town, not even his own family could guess that he was Pikolo, the diminutive and quietly spoken beacon of humanity who inspired his friend and fellow concentration camp inmate Primo Levi to immortalise him in his definitive Holocaust memoir If This is a Man.

Tough lessons: How teachers are seeking answers at Auschwitz

As pupils across the country prepare to return to lessons, Paul Vallely joins a group of teachers on an educational trip to Auschwitz to ask: how do you bring the real horrors of history alive in the classroom?

Kate Simon: This mute witness to genocide must not be allowed to crumble

Auschwitz may not seem a suitable subject for the travel pages, yet this Nazi death camp is one of the world's most poignant museums, visited annually by more than a million people who come to remember the victims of the Holocaust.

Cycling: Riders detour to mark Holocaust

Riders on the Tour of Poland paid their respects to the Holocaust victims of Auschwitz-Birkenau with a short ceremony outside the gates of the concentration camp yesterday.

Anne Frank: The Life, The Book, The Afterlife, By Francine Prose

Can there be anything new to say about Anne Frank? No, and there is nothing really new here. On the other hand, the Anne Frank industry is so huge that there's a lot the ordinary reader doesn't know. This is truer in the US than here: only a quarter of American high school students can identify Hitler, Francine Prose says, whereas more British students can identify Hitler than Oliver Cromwell, to judge from recent reports. But the wider story of the Frank family and their helpers is less well known, and the first part of this book is fascinating.

Auschwitz 'I will survive' dance video is internet sensation

A video showing a Jewish Holocaust survivor and his grandchildren singing and dancing to the tune "I will survive" at the entrance to the Auschwitz death camp has provoked a storm of controversy after receiving more than half a million hits on YouTube.

Whatever Works (12A)

Woody curbs any enthusiasm

Boyd Tonkin: Beasts, Nazis and modern taboos

The week in books

Beatrice and Virgil, By Yann Martel

At first glance, it seems that Yann Martel has responded to the surprising global success of Life of Pi (Man Booker Prize, seven million copies sold) by writing a novel about failure. His novelist protagonist, Henry L'Hôte, has himself responded to writing a Pi­like bestseller by setting himself a somewhat unclear creative challenge. He wants to write a book about the Holocaust that engages in "artful metaphor", presumably in response to Adorno's stipulation: "no poetry after Auschwitz." He argues that the Holocaust has, with the exception of a few books (Maus, Time's Arrow and See Under: Love), always been the domain of "a single school: historical realism."

The Greatest Show On Earth, By Richard Dawkins

"This book is necessary," as its author argues, in part because 44 per cent of Americans think "God created human beings" within the last 10,000 years.

Floods threaten Auschwitz archives

Flooding in southern Poland has killed at least five people, and officials yesterday closed the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial site to protect its Holocaust archives and artifacts.

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