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Capita has won a five-year, £145 million deal to run the congestion charge, which it helped set up in London 11 years ago.

Amber Clabburn, left, Amika Ezer-Christie, centre, and Sadie Hawkins

Results day: what's next?

After getting your results you may have to change your plan of action - you could go to university, head off on a gap year to warmer climes, or become an apprentice

Eames: the Architect and the Painter (12A)

An eye-opening portrait of Charles and Ray Eames, the husband-and-wife team that revolutionised American design in the mid-20th century.

The IBM Sequoia becomes the world’s fastest computer,with the ability to complete in one hour calculations that would take 6.7 billion people more than three centuries to carry out

Faster than a speeding petaflop: IBM flies past Japanese rival to win battle of the supercomputers with its Sequoia machine

American firm's Sequoia machine designed to simulate nuclear bomb tests

The IBM Sequoia becomes the world’s fastest computer,with the ability to complete in one hour calculations that would take 6.7 billion people more than three centuries to carry out

IBM regains top spot for fastest super-computer

The US has regained the crown for having the world's fastest super-computer thanks to a new machine so powerful that it can simulate nuclear bombs and power plant accidents – eliminating the need to conduct dangerous underground tests.

Leading article: Reality finally bites at Augusta

It was only ever a matter of time before the real world came knocking at the door of the Augusta National golf club. Now it is finally doing so – in the person of Virginia Rometty.

The Business On... Virginia Rometty, chief executive, IBM

Ginni to her friends

The PC is dead, says the man who invented it

Back in the late 1950s, the then head of IBM, Thomas J Watson, was rumoured to have predicted a potential world market for "maybe five computers", an estimate that illustrates how radically the role of the computer has changed.

Market Report: HKEx latest to be linked in LSE bid speculation

With bid speculation swirling around the London Stock Exchange (LSE) since its planned merger with TMX fell apart in June, last night the bourse was pushed up the mid-tier index as vague rumours spread that it could receive an approach from its Hong Kong peer.

IBM learns the lessons of its past

The centenary of the computer giant is a cause for celebration

Lenovo expands in Europe

The Chinese computer manufacturer Lenovo is set to increase its share of the European market after agreeing to take over the German electronics retailer Medion in a $900m (£550m) deal.

Bain poised to bid for Micro Focus

Private equity group Bain Capital is targeting software group Micro Focus International and is preparing an offer that could be as much as £890m.

Soapbox: 'The most successful time for a company is also its most dangerous. The reasons for its success can be its downfall'

Business history is littered with highly successful and admired companies that then went into decline and ended up beset by crises and outrun by the competition. They failed to understand that the most successful time in a company's life is its most dangerous time, because the very reasons for its success can also be the seeds of its downfall.

Computer puts human supremacy in jeopardy

There aren't many quiz shows where the stakes are high for anyone but the participants but in the special episodes of Jeopardy! on American television this week, the hundreds of thousands of dollars in prize money are very much an afterthought. The real prize: humanity's continued supremacy in the ongoing struggle to preserve our status against computers. And, last night it was confirmed: man has been trumped by machine.

Video: Unusual Jeapardy contestant

IBM's 'Watson' supercomputer competes against top human competitors on 'Jeopardy' to test the use of artificial intelligence .

Beijing launches car quota to counter gridlock

For thousands of hopeful commuters in China's capital, 2011 started with a click, not a bang.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent