Arts and Entertainment

The playwright/screenwriter’s stage adaptation of Let the Right One In is at the Royal Court, London, until 21 December. His film adaptation of Nick Hornby’s novel A Long Way Down is out in March.

Kodak exposed as revenue falls

EASTMAN KODAK, the world's largest photography company, said fourth- quarter profits rose a lower-than-forecast 39 per cent and warned that 1999 earnings may also fall short of analysts' expectations. Kodak's stock dropped 11 per cent after the chairman, George Fisher, said 1999 profits would, at best, meet current estimates.

Danka negotiates deal with Kodak

Danka negotiates deal with Kodak

Planning delays drive up land prices, says Redrow

REDROW, one of Britain's top 10 housebuilders, yesterday launched a scathing attack on the Government, accusing the authorities of lacking the political will to reduce delays in the planning system.

Danka profits fall as Kodak merger integration takes toll

DANKA Business Systems, the troubled photocopier distributor, yesterday served up more bad news when it reported a 62 per cent fall in first-quarter profits.

In Thing: The Polaroid camera

The Polaroid 600 Instant Camera has already won itself a niche in design history alongside other gadgets whose brand names stand as a generic by-word for any of its competitors' clones: the Hoover, the Walkman, the Kenwood. But while these brands capitalized on the ultimate consumer accolade, the Polaroid, after its arrival in the early 1980s, seemed to fall by the wayside. The advent of the video camera in the mid-Eighties offered the same immediacy but with the added novelty of moving pictures, and the instantaneous nature of the Polaroid was deemed a gimmick rather than a trashy virtue.

Instant replay

THE MATERIAL WORLD Within two seconds of pressing the shutter release a square print with a black centre and smart white frame would shoot out into the photographer's hands Photograph by Robert Powell

Roads: Speed cameras are no deterrent

Speed cameras are failing both to deter over-fast motorists and to punish them properly, says a survey published today. Only 20 per cent of drivers said the risk of being caught by a speed camera made them drive within the speed limit at all times. Of those caught by a speed camera, only one in 10 received a fine or had penalty points on their licence.

THE CANDID CAMERAS

A new breed of compact, foolproof cameras? Our panel got clicking

Love and redemption

Breaking the Waves Lars Von Trier (18) The Blue Villa Alain Robbe- Grillet (18) By Adam Mars-Jones

Letter: RAC and the speed camera

From Mr David Worskett

TODAY'S NUMBER 38

TODAY'S

US to investigate Japanese film market

New York - The United States yesterday launched a formal investigation into claims that the American photographic giant, Kodak, has been unfairly frustrated in the Japanese market, David Usborne writes.

Camera shy

Roadside speed cameras are having little effect on drivers' behaviour, according to a Transport Research Laboratory report. It says motorists resume higher speeds once they are out of camera range.

Letter: Big Brother? Hardly

Sir: Is the repetition of 'Big Brother' in Stewart Hennessey's article ('Long lens of the law', 6 July) really necessary? It might be appropriate if this was an intrusion upon private space. But can there be any more objection to a camera than to a pair of eyes in a public arena?

Camera 'mistake'

The increasing use of surveillance cameras to help cut crime may be an 'expensive mistake' according to the Local Government Information Unit in its study, Candid Cameras. It says no reliable research has been done out to test the cameras' effectiveness.
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