Arts and Entertainment

The playwright/screenwriter’s stage adaptation of Let the Right One In is at the Royal Court, London, until 21 December. His film adaptation of Nick Hornby’s novel A Long Way Down is out in March.

Kodak exposed as revenue falls

EASTMAN KODAK, the world's largest photography company, said fourth- quarter profits rose a lower-than-forecast 39 per cent and warned that 1999 earnings may also fall short of analysts' expectations. Kodak's stock dropped 11 per cent after the chairman, George Fisher, said 1999 profits would, at best, meet current estimates.

Danka negotiates deal with Kodak

Danka negotiates deal with Kodak

Planning delays drive up land prices, says Redrow

REDROW, one of Britain's top 10 housebuilders, yesterday launched a scathing attack on the Government, accusing the authorities of lacking the political will to reduce delays in the planning system.

Danka profits fall as Kodak merger integration takes toll

DANKA Business Systems, the troubled photocopier distributor, yesterday served up more bad news when it reported a 62 per cent fall in first-quarter profits.

In Thing: The Polaroid camera

The Polaroid 600 Instant Camera has already won itself a niche in design history alongside other gadgets whose brand names stand as a generic by-word for any of its competitors' clones: the Hoover, the Walkman, the Kenwood. But while these brands capitalized on the ultimate consumer accolade, the Polaroid, after its arrival in the early 1980s, seemed to fall by the wayside. The advent of the video camera in the mid-Eighties offered the same immediacy but with the added novelty of moving pictures, and the instantaneous nature of the Polaroid was deemed a gimmick rather than a trashy virtue.

Instant replay

THE MATERIAL WORLD Within two seconds of pressing the shutter release a square print with a black centre and smart white frame would shoot out into the photographer's hands Photograph by Robert Powell

Roads: Speed cameras are no deterrent

Speed cameras are failing both to deter over-fast motorists and to punish them properly, says a survey published today. Only 20 per cent of drivers said the risk of being caught by a speed camera made them drive within the speed limit at all times. Of those caught by a speed camera, only one in 10 received a fine or had penalty points on their licence.

THE CANDID CAMERAS

A new breed of compact, foolproof cameras? Our panel got clicking

Love and redemption

Breaking the Waves Lars Von Trier (18) The Blue Villa Alain Robbe- Grillet (18) By Adam Mars-Jones

Letter: RAC and the speed camera

From Mr David Worskett

TODAY'S NUMBER 38

TODAY'S

US to investigate Japanese film market

New York - The United States yesterday launched a formal investigation into claims that the American photographic giant, Kodak, has been unfairly frustrated in the Japanese market, David Usborne writes.

Camera shy

Roadside speed cameras are having little effect on drivers' behaviour, according to a Transport Research Laboratory report. It says motorists resume higher speeds once they are out of camera range.

Letter: Big Brother? Hardly

Sir: Is the repetition of 'Big Brother' in Stewart Hennessey's article ('Long lens of the law', 6 July) really necessary? It might be appropriate if this was an intrusion upon private space. But can there be any more objection to a camera than to a pair of eyes in a public arena?

Camera 'mistake'

The increasing use of surveillance cameras to help cut crime may be an 'expensive mistake' according to the Local Government Information Unit in its study, Candid Cameras. It says no reliable research has been done out to test the cameras' effectiveness.
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<p>Jonathan Ross</p>
<p>Jonathan Ross (or Wossy, as he’s affectionately known) has been on television and radio for an extraordinarily long time, working on a seat in the pantheon of British presenters. Hosting Friday Night with Jonathan Ross for nine years, Ross has been in everything from the video game Fable to Phineas and Ferb. So it’s probably not so surprising that Ross studied at Southampton College of Art (since rebranded Southampton Solent), a university known nowadays for its media production courses.</p>
<p>However, after leaving Solent, Ross studied History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of the UCL, a move that was somewhat out of keeping with the rest of his career. Ross was made a fellow of the school in 2006 in recognition of his services to broadcasting.</p>
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Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past