News Mourners visit the home of Margaret Thatcher in April 2013; her Belgravia house will go on sale after major refurbishment

A development company has bought the property and is getting it ready to sell on

Sean O'Grady: All the candidates were economical with the truth

Judged by the brutal test of whether they made their numbers add up, all the leaders failed badly. Indeed, in this debate on economics, stats hardly got a look in between the soundbites, the "I met a..." anecdotes, and carefully rehearsed jibes.

Andrew Grice: Why politicians are still reluctant to mention the d-word

The problem is that voters want action to 'tackle the deficit' but not if it affects them directly.

Dominic Lawson: The curse of the Bullingdon Club

There are a number of ways in which Cameron seeks to distance himself from the interests of the middle class which is so much part of the identity of the party he leads

Gordon Brown: My Credo

The Prime Minister gives his most revealing interview yet exclusively in <i>The Independent on Sunday</i>

Leading article: Hurrah for democracy!

Who would have thought it? The most unexpected feature of this election campaign is not the sudden success of Nick Clegg. What has taken us all by surprise is that the campaign has become interesting. Mr Clegg's emergence as the star of the televised debates was not unforeseen. Indeed, it was predicted. What was not predicted was the extraordinary effect that this would have on the whole election.

Tories propose six-month limit for unelected PMs

Unelected prime ministers would be forced to hold a general election within six months of taking office, under proposals being announced by David Cameron today.

Steve Richards: Biggest game changer is that voters were engaged

The winner was Clegg, partly for being there... Crucially he seemed relevant

Leading article: An optimistic message that does not quite add up

The Conservative manifesto is convincing only in parts

Alan Watkins: Adonis left it too late for a Lib-Lab pact

Nick Clegg now regards himself as one of the big boys, not as a subordinate partner to Labour

Steve Richards: Labour have forgotten how to box clever on 'tax and spend'

Labour has fallen into a "tax and spend" trap for the first time since Gordon Brown took charge of the party's economic policy in 1992. The entrapment explains the widening of the Conservatives' lead and is, for Labour, extremely dangerous. The single issue of "tax and spend" determines the outcome of elections in Britain, often unfairly but always decisively.

Where the parties stand: Economy

Labour

Parents: Hold on to your purse strings

Passing on your wealth to your children before you die may seem like a good idea, but there are risks, warns Chiara Cavaglieri

Blue candidates show their true colours

In the first in a series of articles, Andrew Grice asks whether the Tories' first-time candidates live up to their leader's billing

Labour 'has cost the rich &pound;25,000 every year'

Institute of Fiscal Studies has laid bare the scale of redistribution since 1997. Sean O&rsquo;Grady reports
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn