127 feared dead in Pakistani passenger death crash

 A Pakistani passenger jet with 127 people on board crashed into wheat fields today as it was trying to land in bad weather at an airport near the capital, Islamabad, officials said. Sobbing relatives of those on the flight flocked to the airport as a government minister expressed little hope of finding survivors.

Omar Waraich: It's in everyone's interest that the dialogue can continue

It has fallen to a new generation to carry peace talks forward

Pakistani MPs demand end to US drone strikes

A Pakistani parliamentary commission yesterday demanded an end to drone attacks inside the country and an apology for deadly air strikes last year as part of a review of its near-severed relations with the US.

David Cameron at Camp Bastion last year. But there is work to do now

Jim Murphy: Our troops never rest. Why does the PM?

Having set a date for pulling British forces out of Afghanistan, ministers are being too passive - and are not even selling the policy

Pakistanis protesting, main, against civilian deaths from US drones

Protests grow as civilian toll of Obama’s drone war on terrorism is laid bare

Outcry from innocent victims’ families as figures show almost a third of strikes fail to hit targets

Gunmen kill 16 passengers in Pakistan bus attack

Gunmen wearing military uniforms today stopped a convoy of buses in northern Pakistan, ordered selected passengers to get off and then killed 16 of them in an apparent sectarian attack, police said.

YOUSUF RAZA GILANI: He refused a court order to prosecute the President for corruption

Pakistan's PM is charged with contempt

The long-simmering face-off between Pakistan’s government and the judiciary finally resulted in action yesterday as the country’s prime minister was formally charged with contempt by the supreme court.

Obama admits use of drones in Pakistan

President Barack Obama has reignited the controversy over the CIA’s deployment of drones in Pakistan, admitting their use for the first time and insisting they were “precision strikes” against anti-American targets.

Hague appeals for calm in Pakistan amid coup fears

Foreign Secretary William Hague today appealed for calm in Pakistan amid fears the army could be preparing to stage a military coup.

US resumes drone attacks along Afghan border

An American drone attack has killed four Islamist militants in Pakistan in the first such assault since errant US air strikes killed two dozen Pakistani troops in November.

Taliban denies it is in peace talks

A Pakistani Taliban spokesman yesterday denied an earlier announcement by the militant group's deputy chief that it was holding peace talks with the government.

Anger at China's access to crashed US helicopter

America's top military commander shunned Pakistan on his final visit to the region because of its decision to allow the Chinese to take a close look at the crashed US helicopter involved in the covert raid that killed Osama bin Laden, an official familiar with the discussions told The Independent.

US suspends military aid to Pakistan

The US is suspending around $800m (£497m) in military assistance to Pakistan, a move that will further worsen the relationship between the two countries. In the latest salvo in the battle of words and deeds between the two supposed allies, William Daley, Barack Obama's Chief of Staff, said the relationship must be made "to work over time". Yet he told ABC television that until "we get through that difficulty, we'll hold back some of the money that the American taxpayers are committed to give".

Leading article: Priorities should change with regards to Pakistan

The Pakistani state has long been accused by its Western allies of facing both ways on terrorism. But Admiral Mike Mullen's accusation last week was even more alarming. The chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff claimed that elements within the Pakistani state "sanctioned" the kidnapping and execution of the journalist, Saleem Shahzad, two months ago. This drew a furious denial from the government in Islamabad.

Suicide bomber hits Islamabad market

A suicide bomber blew himself up at a busy market in the Pakistani capital yesterday, killing at least one person in the first bombing in Islamabad in more than 18 months, police said.

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