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Republican politician won't give up his lifestyle to run for the White House

What's he crying about?

Clinton will make a fool of himself again tomorrow - but he won't be impeached

Clinton's Crisis: Whatever happens from here, Monica's fame is assured

MONICAMANIA is acquiring epidemic proportions in the United States. The Internet has spawned at least a dozen Monica Lewinsky sites. Sales of "Zippergate" T-shirts are going through the roof. Sandwiches are being named after her. Books are in the pipeline and possibly, if she bites at the $2m offer, a Penthouse spread. And everyone, but everyone, has heard a Lewinsky joke.

Clinton accused: What the papers say about fishing, 'bimbo eruptions' and big-game blonde hunting

Washington Post: This time, it's different: The allegations against President Clinton are allegations of extremely serious crimes. If they are true, they cannot be argued about as to that and cannot be expected to dissolve in an "everybody does it" cloud of ambiguity. The allegations are that President Clinton urged a White House intern with whom he had an affair to lie about their relationship in a sworn affidavit ... If the allegations ... prove true, they are of a different magnitude from any of the other myriad charges Mr Clinton has fought back since taking office.

Emotions on trial: When justice is seen to be done

It's difficult to know what to pin on your chest lately. Instead of wearing a poppy for a couple of days, people now seem to wear them for about three weeks. Next to that you can pin your yellow ribbon for Louise Woodward, a pink one for breast cancer awareness and your old Aids ribbon. You can if you so desire add a caterpillar to show that you haven't forgotten what happened to Matthew Eappen. How much more room is there to show that you care? Well, it depends how big your chest is. The symbols of caring and remembering have got out of hand. Poppies and yellow ribbons? Are they really interchangeable?

Woodward Case: The American backlash - Is America turning against the a u pair?

A rumble of anger rolled across America yesterday as disbelief over the conviction of Louise Woodward was replaced by a sense of bewilderment that she was sentenced to just 279 days for manslaughter.

Star-spangled chat show plugs the Kremlin line

For the devoted viewer of that American institution, the late-night talk show, it comes as a surprise. There's the familiar set, the metropolitan skyline, sparkling with wicked nocturnal promise.

Biker chick and invisible woman race for the White House

Hillary Clinton is being kept out of sight, but Elizabeth Dole is being played for all she is worth. Rupert Cornwell reports

Jokers have last laugh on Dole

The US presidential candidates are a rich source of humour for TV show hosts, writes John Carlin

England's first queen of hearts was always Quentin Crisp - now, at 86, resident in Manhattan, where he is one of the few famous people listed in the telephone directory

The merest hint of a commercially manufactured blush glows on the cheek of Quentin Crisp as he sits "like a Dutch prostitute" (his description) in the window of a cheap diner at the seedier end of New York's Lower East Side. Through the window, on the corner of Second Avenue, a bulky wino is sprawling picturesquely on the sidewalk, as though waiting to be photographed for a record-sleeve, and inspirational, though inaccurate, graffiti ("LIFE is a VERB not a NOUN") shout from the hoardings.

Grant pays for his 'lewd conduct'

JOJO MOYES

A bit of this, a lot of chat: A Cheap joke here, the chat-show in America remains a serious (and seriously rich) business. And onem man is taking it over. Giles Smith reports

This week, British viewers get to meet Larry Sanders, the American chat show host with the cheesy grin and the slick blazers. Sanders is a spoof, played by the comedian Garry Shandling, who roams the set of The Larry Sanders Show, caught up in back-stage pettiness and on-air disasters, in the most memorable of which a guest appearance by a spider-handler goes horribly wrong. The comedy is detailed, as befits an inside job: Shandling occasionally stood in for Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show, and so learned about cheesy grins and slick blazers at first hand.

It's no joke as Quayle town honours its favourite son: An Indiana museum will commemorate the former vice-president's career, reports David Usborne

THINGS YOU never knew about Dan Quayle and never really cared to: he had surprisingly large feet at birth; as a schoolboy he was occasionally over-boisterous; in this town, at least, he is a figure of reverence, not ridicule.
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How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue