News The major storm has left up to eight inches of snow on pavements in New York

At least 16 deaths were blamed on a snow storm that swept across the eastern half of the US as North Dakota experiences -35C

US press hail victory for American multitude

The American press were glowing in their praise of Paul Azinger and his USA team after the 16 1/2 to 11 1/2 victory that sent the Ryder Cup back across the Atlantic.

Palavicini tries to follow in famous hoof prints

Perhaps it is something to do with those cases of claret waiting on the podium at Newbury today. The sponsors, after all, are a firm of wine merchants. For one reason or another, anyhow, over the years trainers have carved a special frieze for the Haynes, Hanson and Clark Stakes in the pantheon of Flat racing.

Repairs begin after Ike cuts up roughon course

A clean-up operation was under way at the Ryder Cup venue yesterday after the remnants of Hurricane Ike ripped through Louisville. Kentucky's governor, Steve Beshear, declared a state of emergency when winds gusting up to 90mph on Sunday afternoon caused two deaths – one a 10-year-old boy mowing the lawn at home when a tree hit him – and left hundreds of thousands without power, possibly for more than a week.

Tony Snow: Former White House spokesman

Tony Snow was the former broadcaster and Fox News journalist who as White House press secretary brought badly needed showmanship to the job of selling President George W. Bush.

Big Brown continues 30 years of pain in Triple Crown pursuit

America expected an imperious, rampant champion, a lap of honour, a first Triple Crown winner in three decades. Instead the abiding image was of Rick Dutrow, slumped alone over a rail in a hidden corner of Belmont Park, the very picture of dejection. All that could be seen of the trainer was his broad, sagging back, his light blue shirt blackened with sweat. His world had come apart, and even American cameras would pry no closer.

Big Brown has to rise above pedigree to claim Crown

Big Brown, who has scarcely come off the bridle on the march to greatness, is the white hot favourite to answer a nation's yearning in the Belmont Stakes tonight.

I'm within reach of victory, says Obama

Barack Obama stepped to the brink of victory in the Democratic presidential race today, defeating Hillary Clinton in the Oregon primary and moving within 100 delegates of the total needed to claim the prize at the party convention this summer.

The mountain that lost its top

It's the one environmental crime that no US politician will confront – the destruction of Kentucky's mountains. Leonard Doyle visits the Appalachian peaks being blasted by Big Coal

Big Brown's Kentucky win marred by death of Eight Belles

The high toll that American dirt tracks take on equine performers was again called into question after the death of Eight Belles, runner-up to Big Brown in Saturday's Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs. The filly finished second to the favourite but stumbled to the track after the winning line, having broken her front ankles.

Execution by lethal injection under renewed scrutiny

Most US states that permit lethal-injection executions prevent veterinarians from using the same method to put animals down, according to a new study.

Bill Bolick: Half of the hillbilly Blue Sky Boys

Bill and Earl Bolick, known as the Blue Sky Boys, were among the greatest of the many brother acts of the hillbilly music scene of the 1930s. Their astonishingly beautiful and complex harmonies remain great treasures of the genre.

US Bible Belt begins clear-up after the worst tornadoes in 20 years

Dazed survivors of the worst tornadoes to hit the American Bible Belt in more than two decades surveyed the wreckage of their flattened homes yesterday, as state and federal clean-up crews herded them into temporary shelters and started to tackle downed power lines, severed gas pipes, fallen trees and debris as far as the eye could see.

US tornado strikes kill at least 45

Tornados and thunderstorms ravaged the US South overnight, killing at least 45 people and injuring more than 150 as it caused destruction across several states, authorities said.

Leading article: Iraq is being ethnically cleansed, and our troops can do nothing

The worst and most frightening things take place in secret. There is a sinister logic to this, because when violence reaches a certain level of sadistic intensity and terrifying unpredictability, television cameras tend not to be present.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent