News Rocha turns away after scoring for Uruguay in the 2-1 win over France at White City during the 1966 World Cup group stage

The exquisitely skilful Uruguayan attacker Pedro Rocha was billed as the man most likely to deal an early blow to England's dreams of footballing glory in the opening match of the 1966 World Cup finals at Wembley.

Leading Article: Today we save energy, tomorrow we save the world

In a temple in Kyoto is the original wooden statue of the three monkeys who can hear no evil, see no evil and speak no evil: precisely the attitude of the vast majority of the world's population to the effect of their lifestyles on the earth's climate. Next week, world environment ministers gather in Kyoto to face one of the central political dilemmas of our time. How can political leaders secure consent for policies needed to sustain anything like the present numbers of people on this crowded planet?

Kyoto Summit: Trying to slow the global-warming supertanker

For five years, a battle has been brewing over what to do about the threat of man-made climate change. Our Environment Correspondent anticipates next week's showdown in Kyoto.

Kyoto Summit: Atoll nations get that sinking feeling

The Kyoto talks will take place in a fog of uncertainty - about precisely what the threats are from man-made climate change, how soon they will arrive, and what can be done to avert them.

US environmental chief quits for UN post

Casting a shadow over critical global warming talks that begin on 1 December in Kyoto, Japan, Tim Wirth, the US Under-Secretary of State who had been expected to lead the American delegation, is resigning his post in order to manage the $1bn donation recently made by Ted Turner, the American media magnate who founded CNN, to the United Nations.

Prescott flies to Tokyo to save the world and encounters only hot air

Emergency talks on how nations should tackle the threat of global climate change made disappointingly little progress in Japan over the weekend. Time is running out, explains Nicholas Schoon, our Environment Correspondent.

Climate: Clinton takes his own raincheck

President Clinton and more than half his Cabinet took part in a day-long conference on climate change yesterday. Mary Dejevsky reports on Mr Clinton's latest effort to persuade the US to accept cuts in greenhouse gases For the President of the United States to devote the best part of a day to chairing a series of scientific and economic panels on global warming - its causes, effects and possible remedies - was a sign of the importance this issue is assuming for his administration.

Global doom? Surely not in Chiantishire

Eating dinner in the garden in the balmy dusk of an October evening last week made me feel like a latter-day Dr Strangelove. Maybe it was time to stop worrying and learn to love global warming.

Enviroment: Clinton pulls out the stops to turn the US green

The United States is under pressure to match Europe's reductions in carbon emissions before world leaders meet in Kyoto to negotiate a global climate treaty.

Environment: Is the global warming rhetoric just hot air?

The Government's chief scientific adviser has set out the challenges presented by global warming. Charles Arthur, Science Editor, looks at what he has to say while (below right) Nicholas Schoon, Environment Correspondent, asks whether Tony Blair will be able to live up to his green rhetoric.

Politics: Blair to call for action over global warming

Tony Blair will signal moves to tackle climate change in his speech tomorrow at Labour's conference in Brighton. Fran Abrams has discovered there are whispers that the Government may be backsliding on promises made earlier this year. But is the Prime Minister simply delivering a shot across the bows of colleagues less serious about the environment?

Obituary: Professor Yuji Aida

Yuji Aida, writer, scholar and journalist: born Kyoto, Japan 1916; Professor of Humanities, Kyoto University 1939-78 (Emeritus); married; died Sakyo-ku, Japan 17 September 1997.

Letter: Climate change causes flooding

Letter: Climate change

Travel rail journeys: From neon to cherry blossom by bullet

Your train leaves on time to the second and travels as fast as any other in the world - this can only be one country. Jane Drinkwater takes the shinkansen from Tokyo to Kyoto

American oil giants block efforts to end global warming

Deadline for action approaches, but lobbying by powerful companies is stalling international agreement, reports Nicholas Schoon

Police raid insurance agent

Police investigating a pounds 100m insurance fraud, which hit Lloyd's syndicates, insurers and brokers in the City, have seized hundreds of documents and computer files from a London insurance agent.
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Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Drifting and forgotten - turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Our partner charities help veterans on the brink – and get them back on their feet
Putin’s far-right ambition: Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU

Putin’s far-right ambition

Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU
Tove Jansson's Moominland: What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?

Escape to Moominland

What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?
Nightclubbing with Richard Young: The story behind his latest book of celebrity photographs

24-Hour party person

Photographer Richard Young has been snapping celebrities at play for 40 years. As his latest book is released, he reveals that it wasn’t all fun and games
Michelle Obama's school dinners: America’s children have a message for the First Lady

A taste for rebellion

US children have started an online protest against Michelle Obama’s drive for healthy school meals by posting photos of their lunches
Colouring books for adults: How the French are going crazy for Crayolas

Colouring books for adults

How the French are going crazy for Crayolas
Jack Thorne's play 'Hope': What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

Playwright Jack Thorne's latest work 'Hope' poses the question to audiences
Ed Harcourt on Romeo Beckham and life as a court composer at Burberry

Call me Ed Mozart

Paloma Faith, Lana del Ray... Romeo Beckham. Ed Harcourt has proved that he can write for them all. But it took a personal crisis to turn him from indie star to writer-for-hire
10 best stocking fillers for foodies

Festive treats: 10 best stocking fillers for foodies

From boozy milk to wasabi, give the food-lover in your life some extra-special, unusual treats to wake up to on Christmas morning
Phil Hughes head injury: He had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Phil Hughes had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Prolific opener had world at his feet until Harmison and Flintoff bounced him
'I have an age of attraction that starts as low as four': How do you deal with a paedophile who has never committed a crime?

'I am a paedophile'

Is our approach to sex offenders helping to create more victims?
How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

Serco given Yarl’s Wood immigration contract despite ‘vast failings’
Green Party on the march in Bristol: From a lost deposit to victory

From a lost deposit to victory

Green Party on the march in Bristol
Putting the grot right into Santa's grotto

Winter blunderlands

Putting the grot into grotto
'It just came to us, why not do it naked?' London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital

'It just came to us, why not do it naked?'

London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital