News Rocha turns away after scoring for Uruguay in the 2-1 win over France at White City during the 1966 World Cup group stage

The exquisitely skilful Uruguayan attacker Pedro Rocha was billed as the man most likely to deal an early blow to England's dreams of footballing glory in the opening match of the 1966 World Cup finals at Wembley.

Dominic Lawson: Kyoto is worthless (and you don't have to be a sceptic to believe that now)

The EU has managed to claim success while increasing emissions by 13 per cent

Former MoD boss is first transsexual geisha

A 70-year-old former Ministry of Defence manager today claimed to be the first transsexual to be allowed to dress as a geisha in Japan's historical city of Kyoto.

Leading article: A worthless gust of hot air

Taking part in a traditional Japanese Tanabata festival in Hokkaido this week, George Bush tied a piece of parchment to a bamboo tree. On the parchment, the President of the United States outlined his dearest wishes for the future of the planet. And there is evidence of yet more wishful thinking in the G8's communiqué on climate change from Hokkaido.

Sean O'Grady: The global economy will have to adjust – and it will

Short term, there's no doubt that oil at $250 a barrel would be as traumatic a shock to the world's economic system as anything that has been thrown at it since the end of the Second World War. It would be worse than the oil shocks of 1973 and 1979.

Pick of the picture books: 80 Gardens, by Monty Don

A travelogue from the perspective that "the most interesting thing to be found in any garden is the person that made it", this is not about world's "best" gardens, but the ones that say the most about the planet's diverse and wonderful gardeners. Around The World In 80 Gardens by Monty Don (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20) takes in six continents (Antarctica not being a gardener's paradise) to prove the author's theory that "people are always more interesting than plants". Don is a curious and engaging guide, as thrilled by the ad hoc floating vegetable plots of the Amazon (right) as by formal Zen gardens in Kyoto or the Moonlight Garden of the Taj Mahal. "If I have only learnt one thing from my travels around the world, it is that no garden is an island," he writes. "Context is everything."

The Teahouse Fire, by Ellis Avery

The rigidity of Japanese society squeezes out the emotional life of this tale

Power failure: What Britain should learn from Finland's nuclear saga

It was hailed as the template for all future reactors – but then they tried to build it.

Sir Philip and the biggest pay cut in history

The king of the high street took home a £1.2bn dividend last year. But this time, Sir Philip Green is feeling a slight financial chill as profits slump at Arcadia and Bhs

Bush is accused of hot air as Kyoto comes into force

The Bush administration was accused yesterday of deception after it claimed it was making a serious commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, despite its non-participation in the Kyoto agreement.

When to stand on ceremony

From sake shrines to tea temples, the role of ritual in Japanese culture is an eye-opening experience. By Rhiannon Batten

CBI chief chides Bush over US protectionism

Digby Jones urges public sector pension reform
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
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exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
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Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
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'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
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Colombia's James Rodriguez celebrates one of his goals during the FIFA World Cup 2014 round of 16 match between Colombia and Uruguay at the Estadio do Maracana in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
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News to me: family events were recorded in the personal columns
techFamily events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped that
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary