News Rocha turns away after scoring for Uruguay in the 2-1 win over France at White City during the 1966 World Cup group stage

The exquisitely skilful Uruguayan attacker Pedro Rocha was billed as the man most likely to deal an early blow to England's dreams of footballing glory in the opening match of the 1966 World Cup finals at Wembley.

Dominic Lawson: Kyoto is worthless (and you don't have to be a sceptic to believe that now)

The EU has managed to claim success while increasing emissions by 13 per cent

Former MoD boss is first transsexual geisha

A 70-year-old former Ministry of Defence manager today claimed to be the first transsexual to be allowed to dress as a geisha in Japan's historical city of Kyoto.

Leading article: A worthless gust of hot air

Taking part in a traditional Japanese Tanabata festival in Hokkaido this week, George Bush tied a piece of parchment to a bamboo tree. On the parchment, the President of the United States outlined his dearest wishes for the future of the planet. And there is evidence of yet more wishful thinking in the G8's communiqué on climate change from Hokkaido.

Sean O'Grady: The global economy will have to adjust – and it will

Short term, there's no doubt that oil at $250 a barrel would be as traumatic a shock to the world's economic system as anything that has been thrown at it since the end of the Second World War. It would be worse than the oil shocks of 1973 and 1979.

Pick of the picture books: 80 Gardens, by Monty Don

A travelogue from the perspective that "the most interesting thing to be found in any garden is the person that made it", this is not about world's "best" gardens, but the ones that say the most about the planet's diverse and wonderful gardeners. Around The World In 80 Gardens by Monty Don (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20) takes in six continents (Antarctica not being a gardener's paradise) to prove the author's theory that "people are always more interesting than plants". Don is a curious and engaging guide, as thrilled by the ad hoc floating vegetable plots of the Amazon (right) as by formal Zen gardens in Kyoto or the Moonlight Garden of the Taj Mahal. "If I have only learnt one thing from my travels around the world, it is that no garden is an island," he writes. "Context is everything."

The Teahouse Fire, by Ellis Avery

The rigidity of Japanese society squeezes out the emotional life of this tale

Power failure: What Britain should learn from Finland's nuclear saga

It was hailed as the template for all future reactors – but then they tried to build it.

Sir Philip and the biggest pay cut in history

The king of the high street took home a £1.2bn dividend last year. But this time, Sir Philip Green is feeling a slight financial chill as profits slump at Arcadia and Bhs

Bush is accused of hot air as Kyoto comes into force

The Bush administration was accused yesterday of deception after it claimed it was making a serious commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, despite its non-participation in the Kyoto agreement.

When to stand on ceremony

From sake shrines to tea temples, the role of ritual in Japanese culture is an eye-opening experience. By Rhiannon Batten

CBI chief chides Bush over US protectionism

Digby Jones urges public sector pension reform
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before