News Rocha turns away after scoring for Uruguay in the 2-1 win over France at White City during the 1966 World Cup group stage

The exquisitely skilful Uruguayan attacker Pedro Rocha was billed as the man most likely to deal an early blow to England's dreams of footballing glory in the opening match of the 1966 World Cup finals at Wembley.

THE REAL GEISHA

In writing his bestselling novel, Memoirs of a Geisha, soon to be made into a Spielberg film, Arthur Golden drew heavily on the memories of one woman. He told David Usborne her story

UK's new global warming crusade

THE WAYS in which all of Britain can contribute to countering global warming were set out in fine detail yesterday by the Government, in one of the first exercises of its kind.

Sea-bed fuel poses tidal wave danger

ENERGY

New tax on energy could raise pounds 5bn

A "GREEN" windfall tax looks set is to be levied on the gas and electricity generators, with the aim of raising prices to force industry to cut excessive energy use and cut harmful emissions.

A Week in the Life of: Koaki, Apprentice Geisha - Schooled in the arts of pleasure

KOAKI IS a 20-year-old maiko, or apprentice geisha. This apprenticeship will eventually qualify her for a life entertaining men at banquets and private parties with dancing, singing and witty conversation.

UK pushes for green Europe

BRITAIN WILL this week formally offer to step up its fight against pollution, in a bid to prevent the collapse of international efforts to combat global warming.

Britain attacks US over evasion of cuts in greenhouse gases

A SERIOUS split between the United States and Britain over how to tackle global warming emerged yesterday on the eve of the G8 summit in Birmingham.

Politics: Conservatives cash in on car drivers' fears

THE TORIES are to become the car drivers' champions as party strategists seized an opportunity to cash in on motorists' fears that greener transport will cost them money. Sir Norman Fowler, Conservative transport spokesman, kicks off the campaign today with parliamentary questions and an attack on plans for new taxes on motorists.

Leading article: A green star is rising

JOHN Prescott bagged himself a couple of pretty big handles when Labour came to power, Deputy Prime Minister and Secretary of State of the absurdly-large Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. But who would have thought he would add Saviour of the Planet? To be honest, we suspected last May that the pomposity of his titles was in inverse proportion to his likely influence. When he boasted to the Today programme soon after the election that he was going to be greener than John Gummer, this newspaper - which had secretly rather admired the outgoing Conservative minister - had its doubts. But Mr Prescott, along with Jack Straw, the Home Secretary, has turned out to be one of the stars of the New Labour administration. And a green star at that. It is not going too far to say that he single-handedly rescued the Kyoto summit on global warming in December. He criss-crossed the globe, identifying the awkward parties and being nice to them beforehand. Sure, he burned up a lot of environmentally- unfriendly aviation fuel in the effort, but in the long run our children may well be grateful for it.

Prescott boost for green cars

DEPUTY Prime Minister John Prescott is to stage an unprecedented green motor show this spring for ministers and mayors from all over Europe. Major car manufacturers will unveil new, less polluting models as part of his drive to beat global warming.

Obituary: Professor Kenichi Fukui

Kenichi Fukui, chemist: born Nara, Japan 4 October 1918; Lecturer, Kyoto University 1943-45, Assistant Professor 1945-51, Professor 1951-82; Nobel Prize in Chemistry (with Roald Hoffmann) 1981; President, Kyoto Institute of Technology 1982- 88; Director, Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto 1988-98; married 1947 Tomoe Horie (one son, one daughter); died Kyoto, Japan 9 January 1998.

Weather: Supermodels keeping up with fashion

The global warming debate depends heavily on computer models of climate change. It may, however, take another

Amazing turn on the road from Kyoto

IS MY memory playing up? As I recall, it was only last month that the United States car industry was in top gear, trying to stop agreement on fighting global warming in Kyoto. And wasn't it forecasting ruin if the treaty was adopted, saying that it would not be able to meet the target set for reducing pollution?

That was '97, another year of rising heat

1997 will be England's third warmest year since temperature records began more than three centuries ago. Man-made global warming can already be seen in temperature trends for the entire globe. Now, says Nicholas Schoon, Environment Correspondent, climatologists are trying to establish whether it has begun in Britain.

Letter: Slow down

Geoffrey Lean describes John Prescott's efforts as deadlock breaker in Kyoto (14 December). Let's hope he has conserved some energy to achieve cuts in greenhouse gases in this country.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project