News Rocha turns away after scoring for Uruguay in the 2-1 win over France at White City during the 1966 World Cup group stage

The exquisitely skilful Uruguayan attacker Pedro Rocha was billed as the man most likely to deal an early blow to England's dreams of footballing glory in the opening match of the 1966 World Cup finals at Wembley.

THE REAL GEISHA

In writing his bestselling novel, Memoirs of a Geisha, soon to be made into a Spielberg film, Arthur Golden drew heavily on the memories of one woman. He told David Usborne her story

UK's new global warming crusade

THE WAYS in which all of Britain can contribute to countering global warming were set out in fine detail yesterday by the Government, in one of the first exercises of its kind.

Sea-bed fuel poses tidal wave danger

ENERGY

New tax on energy could raise pounds 5bn

A "GREEN" windfall tax looks set is to be levied on the gas and electricity generators, with the aim of raising prices to force industry to cut excessive energy use and cut harmful emissions.

A Week in the Life of: Koaki, Apprentice Geisha - Schooled in the arts of pleasure

KOAKI IS a 20-year-old maiko, or apprentice geisha. This apprenticeship will eventually qualify her for a life entertaining men at banquets and private parties with dancing, singing and witty conversation.

UK pushes for green Europe

BRITAIN WILL this week formally offer to step up its fight against pollution, in a bid to prevent the collapse of international efforts to combat global warming.

Britain attacks US over evasion of cuts in greenhouse gases

A SERIOUS split between the United States and Britain over how to tackle global warming emerged yesterday on the eve of the G8 summit in Birmingham.

Politics: Conservatives cash in on car drivers' fears

THE TORIES are to become the car drivers' champions as party strategists seized an opportunity to cash in on motorists' fears that greener transport will cost them money. Sir Norman Fowler, Conservative transport spokesman, kicks off the campaign today with parliamentary questions and an attack on plans for new taxes on motorists.

Leading article: A green star is rising

JOHN Prescott bagged himself a couple of pretty big handles when Labour came to power, Deputy Prime Minister and Secretary of State of the absurdly-large Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. But who would have thought he would add Saviour of the Planet? To be honest, we suspected last May that the pomposity of his titles was in inverse proportion to his likely influence. When he boasted to the Today programme soon after the election that he was going to be greener than John Gummer, this newspaper - which had secretly rather admired the outgoing Conservative minister - had its doubts. But Mr Prescott, along with Jack Straw, the Home Secretary, has turned out to be one of the stars of the New Labour administration. And a green star at that. It is not going too far to say that he single-handedly rescued the Kyoto summit on global warming in December. He criss-crossed the globe, identifying the awkward parties and being nice to them beforehand. Sure, he burned up a lot of environmentally- unfriendly aviation fuel in the effort, but in the long run our children may well be grateful for it.

Prescott boost for green cars

DEPUTY Prime Minister John Prescott is to stage an unprecedented green motor show this spring for ministers and mayors from all over Europe. Major car manufacturers will unveil new, less polluting models as part of his drive to beat global warming.

Obituary: Professor Kenichi Fukui

Kenichi Fukui, chemist: born Nara, Japan 4 October 1918; Lecturer, Kyoto University 1943-45, Assistant Professor 1945-51, Professor 1951-82; Nobel Prize in Chemistry (with Roald Hoffmann) 1981; President, Kyoto Institute of Technology 1982- 88; Director, Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto 1988-98; married 1947 Tomoe Horie (one son, one daughter); died Kyoto, Japan 9 January 1998.

Weather: Supermodels keeping up with fashion

The global warming debate depends heavily on computer models of climate change. It may, however, take another

Amazing turn on the road from Kyoto

IS MY memory playing up? As I recall, it was only last month that the United States car industry was in top gear, trying to stop agreement on fighting global warming in Kyoto. And wasn't it forecasting ruin if the treaty was adopted, saying that it would not be able to meet the target set for reducing pollution?

That was '97, another year of rising heat

1997 will be England's third warmest year since temperature records began more than three centuries ago. Man-made global warming can already be seen in temperature trends for the entire globe. Now, says Nicholas Schoon, Environment Correspondent, climatologists are trying to establish whether it has begun in Britain.

Letter: Slow down

Geoffrey Lean describes John Prescott's efforts as deadlock breaker in Kyoto (14 December). Let's hope he has conserved some energy to achieve cuts in greenhouse gases in this country.
Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices