Lausanne

Top scientist quits Olympics anti-doping body in 'muzzling' claim

A scientist with a leading role in anti-doping at the London Olympics has resigned amid claims he is being "muzzled" by authorities. Dr Michael Ashenden is a leading expert on blood doping in cycling and has been critical of the effectiveness of "biological passports" in monitoring potential doping.

John Stott: Preacher and writer who exerted a colossal influence on

Few churchmen become the subjects of doctoral theses. The life and influence of John Stott, Chaplain to the Queen, university missioner on six continents, and statesman theologian, has attracted original research in 10 universities. His name appeared in Time magazine in April 2005 in the company of Condoleezza Rice and Oprah Winfrey as "one of the 100 most influential figures in the world". A New York Times op ed that year declared that if evangelicals could elect a pope, Stott would be that man.

Tamgho ruled out of World Championships

Phillips Idowu will still have to hop, step and jump for gold, but the Briton's prospects of successfully defending his triple jump crown at the World Championships in Daegu, South Korea, next month brightened considerably yesterday afternoon with the news that Teddy Tamgho will be out of commission.

Greene becomes gold contender as 2012 hopes start to grow

Another day, another update of the record books by a British athlete. Last weekend it was Holly Bleasdale with a British pole vault record in Mannheim. On Friday it was Chris Tomlinson with a new national mark for the long jump. On Saturday it was Lawrence Okoye – the former rugby-playing "schoolboy Lomu", a try scorer at Twickenham last year – with a whopping great world class British discus record in sun-baked Hendon.

Robert Fisk: A man's life seen through his remarkable possessions

When Edward Nassar asked General Bernard Law Montgomery to sign his autobiography, "Monty" invited the Lebanese collector to his English home. "The front door opened and there was a long corridor in front of me. And there were 20 oil paintings on the wall. And they were all of Montgomery! All 20 of them! There was Montgomery with Eisenhower, Montgomery with Churchill, Montgomery, Montgomery, Montgomery..."

Peter and the wolf cubs

For the Royal Ballet's latest production, the oldest dancer on stage – by several years – is just 20. Rob Sharp reports

Simpson ready for part as leading lady

In the centre of St Austell there is a mural displaying some of the most notable sons and daughters of the Cornish town. Next to images of Daphne du Maurier, Nigel Martyn and John Nettles is one of Jemma Simpson. The 26-year-old has appeared as an extra on Neighbours and been on the set of The Da Vinci Code but it is fair to say that in the wider world beyond the Tamar Bridge, she has yet to make a name for herself as a leading lady.

More headlines

Observations: Sanaa reaches peak critical acclaim after 15 years

This week, Sanaa, aka the Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, won their profession's Oscar, the $100,000 Pritzker Prize. It's either an extraordinary achievement, or just a sign of our age of cultural velocities, that this design partnership has reached peak critical acclaim after only 15 years. It took Fumihiko Maki, one of Japan's other two Pritzker laureates, decades to get the gong. Ditto the godfather of baroque modernism, Oscar Niemeyer. Even Rem Koolhaas, already a legendary architectural manifesto machine in the early 1970s, had to wait more than 25 years to be anointed.

Learning curve: Sanaa's spectacular floating Lausanne library rockets

In Lausanne yesterday, the feted Japanese architects Kazuo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa – aka Sanaa – became the profession's anointed artists of the floating world. Their new SF110m (£65m) building is a fluid exercise in glass and concrete. It is called the Rolex Learning Centre. Yet visually, it is the reverse – a kind of unlearning centre where the doors of perception melt into a soft vitreous glaze and shape and edge become ambiguous.

Jean-François Bergier: Historian whose commission exposed Swiss

Jean-François Bergier was a respected Swiss historian who exposed his country's dark deeds during the Second World War. He led the Independent Commission of Experts (ICE), which was set up in December 1996 by the Swiss parliament and given a wide range of powers to examine neutral Switzerland's relationship with Nazi Germany during the war. The investigation came about following a scandal involving dormant Swiss bank accounts belonging to victims of the Holocaust. There was much criticism from Jewish groups, particularly in America, that Swiss banks had made it difficult for heirs of Holocaust victims to claim assets deposited by their relatives. The saga became a huge national embarrassment and received worldwide coverage, much to the annoyance of the Swiss authorities.