News Daniel Craig as James Bond in Skyfall. Spies in the UK are to be allowed to break the speed limit new motoring law proposals

Change to UK motoring laws will also give speeding exemptions to transplant organ couriers and bomb disposal units

Adrian Hamilton: The charade of public inquiries

Those who shout 'cover up' at any government-ordered investigation fail to understand the political imperatives

Joan Smith: In 'Loyalty', truth and fiction are one and the same

I've never really believed that Tony Blair lied about why he wanted to go to war in Iraq. I've always thought he convinced himself that Saddam Hussein had WMD – not that difficult for someone who believes in an invisible deity – and dismissed people who thought differently. Now my instinct has been confirmed by Sarah Helm's play Loyalty, which I've just seen at the Hampstead Theatre in London. At the time of the war, Helm lived with (and is now married to) Jonathan Powell, Blair's chief of staff. It was Powell's job to monitor telephone conversations between Blair and important people, and in the play, "Laura", the character loosely based on Helm, listens in.

Chilcot report to criticise Blair

Tony Blair is expected to be warned within days that he faces criticism by the inquiry into the Iraq war.

Alastair Campbell leaks were 'unguided missile' ahead of Iraq war

Alastair Campbell was an "unguided missile" who leaked information from MI6 to journalists in his attempts to justify the invasion of Iraq, according to a senior intelligence officer who gave evidence to the Chilcot Inquiry.

Campbell 'like an unguided missile' on Iraq

MI6 regarded Alastair Campbell as "somewhat of an unguided missile" in discussions about intelligence before the Iraq War, a senior intelligence officer has said.

Guantanamo detainees in court victory

Britain's highest court has dismissed an attempt by MI5 and MI6 to hide evidence of their alleged complicity in the torture of British residents and their rendition to Guantanamo Bay.

Spy chiefs to give evidence in public at torture inquiry

The heads of MI5 and MI6 are to be asked to give evidence in public at an inquiry into the alleged torture of British terrorist suspects.

Last Weekend: Do you want to know a secret? The only way is Bucks

Careless talk costs lives, but careful listening can save souls by the millions: that is the message at the Buckinghamshire home of the codebreakers who helped to turn around the Second World War and hasten Nazi Germany's fall.

MI6, By Keith Jeffery

Allowed unrestricted access to MI6 files up to 1949, Jeffery has constructed a detailed and compulsive narrative. He achieves this by making the story "essentially one of people".

Letters: The Iraq Dossier

Mystery of Iraq 'golden bullet'

Adrian Hamilton: The doubters have their day

If Sir John Chilcot has achieved nothing else, his inquiry has brought out of the woodwork a steady stream of officials anxious to distance themselves from the invasion of Iraq and in particular the intelligence assessments used to justify it. There is no doubting the importance of the letter now released by Major-General Michael Laurie, a senior member of the Defence Intelligence Staff at the time. Not only does it contradict Alastair Campbell's evidence that the dossier published in the run-up to war was not intended to "make the case for war", it also contradicts the evidence of the intelligence chiefs who helped write the document.

MI6 made secret plan for anti-Saddam coup in December 2001

MI6 drew up proposals to support a coup against Saddam Hussein three months after the terrorist attacks on 11 September in the United States, previously classified documents indicate.

WikiLeaks: Terror suspect 'was British agent'

An al-Qa'ida operative accused of bombing Christian churches and a luxury hotel in Pakistan in 2002 was working for British intelligence at the same time, according to leaked files.

US scrambles to contain fallout from 'damaging' Guantanamo leak

President again under pressure to make good on promise to close camp
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine