Madagascar

Bones unearthed in search at former Florida boys reform school

Teams of searchers recovered human bones from the sands of Florida Panhandle woodlands on Saturday in a “boot hill” graveyard where juveniles who disappeared from a notorious Old South reform school more than a half-century ago are believed to have been secretly buried.

Album: Jef Gilson, The Best of Jef Gilson (Jazzman)

From jazz waltzes and groovesome modal vamps to the devotional operatic mash-up of "Agnus Dei" and an incredible version of "The Creator Has A Masterplan" recorded in Madagascar in 1969, this survey of the neglected French composer/pianist Gilson hits you like a bolt from the blue.

Mad about Madagascar

David Attenborough loves its exuberant wildlife, but this island in the Indian ocean has much more besides lemurs to offer, reveals Kate Eshelby

Where the weird things are: Meet the finger-lickin' odd aye-aye

If Madagascar is the kingdom of the weird, then the aye-aye surely wears its crown. Just one glimpse of those bulging orange eyes, naked bats' ears and crooked witches' fingers explains why this creature is, for many islanders, the stuff of the heebie-jeebies.

Small Talk: Madagascar Oilgets set to bring its island story to AIM

If there is one thing that AIM market investors don't lack, it's options in the oil industry. The growth index boasts a variety of opportunities to put money in the black stuff. And this week, it will witness the debut of another, this one offering exposure to resources in the island nation of Madagascar.

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Ol' blue eyes faces the final curtain

Ever seen such bright blue eyes? The blue-eyed black lemur of Madagascar is something of a celebrity. "We always say they are the Hollywood stars of the primates," said Christoph Schwitzer, who studies the animals in Madagascar's north-western forests. "Stunningly beautiful, but a bit stupid."

Wish you weren't here: The devastating effects of the new colonialists

A new breed of colonialism is rampaging across the world, with rich nations buying up the natural resources of developing countries that can ill afford to sell. Some staggering deals have already been done, says Paul Vallely, but angry locals are now trying to stop the landgrabs