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World’s rarest ducks make Easter debut

Six years ago their kind was feared extinct, but 18 newborn ducklings from the world's most endangered duck species – the Madagascar pochard – met the public for the first time yesterday.

Album: Jef Gilson, The Best of Jef Gilson (Jazzman)

From jazz waltzes and groovesome modal vamps to the devotional operatic mash-up of "Agnus Dei" and an incredible version of "The Creator Has A Masterplan" recorded in Madagascar in 1969, this survey of the neglected French composer/pianist Gilson hits you like a bolt from the blue.

Mad about Madagascar

David Attenborough loves its exuberant wildlife, but this island in the Indian ocean has much more besides lemurs to offer, reveals Kate Eshelby

Where the weird things are: Meet the finger-lickin' odd aye-aye

If Madagascar is the kingdom of the weird, then the aye-aye surely wears its crown. Just one glimpse of those bulging orange eyes, naked bats' ears and crooked witches' fingers explains why this creature is, for many islanders, the stuff of the heebie-jeebies.

Small Talk: Madagascar Oilgets set to bring its island story to AIM

If there is one thing that AIM market investors don't lack, it's options in the oil industry. The growth index boasts a variety of opportunities to put money in the black stuff. And this week, it will witness the debut of another, this one offering exposure to resources in the island nation of Madagascar.

Ol' blue eyes faces the final curtain

Ever seen such bright blue eyes? The blue-eyed black lemur of Madagascar is something of a celebrity. "We always say they are the Hollywood stars of the primates," said Christoph Schwitzer, who studies the animals in Madagascar's north-western forests. "Stunningly beautiful, but a bit stupid."

More headlines

The Big Question: What is going on in Madagascar, and can the African

After three months of violent unrest, an opposition leader on the vast Indian Ocean island of Madagascar has set himself up in the President's offices in the capital Antananarivo, declaring himself de facto boss. The elected President, Marc Ravalomanana, is holed up at his palace on the outskirts of the city, guarded by a poorly-armed crowd of loyalists. After insisting for days that he would not resign and would fight "to the death" if necessary, he appeared to signal yesterday that he had quit. His departure would hand power to a military board, only a day after the army stormed his city offices in a show of support for his political rival.

Madagascar's president 'steps down'

Madagascar's President Marc Ravalomanana handed power to a navy admiral today after a power struggle with the opposition on the Indian Ocean island, a presidential aide said.