Sport Amir Khan will find out in the next two weeks if he has secured a fight with Floyd Mayweather

Floyd Mayweather is looking for somebody to make rich in 2014, knowing that he will leave somebody else frustrated and poorer at the snub.

Sports' year of the greats

In the last few months sport has often made the headlines for the wrong reasons. But as The Independent’s experts point out, there have also been some scintillating individual performances that match or surpass the very best of all time

James Lawton: Slap on Renault's wrist is not enough to condemn F1 chicanery to history

You have to wonder if there are any limits now. If it is possible to employ men you vetted, and who carry your name, who go on to rig a race, strategically smash a car into a barrier, risk lives and damnation, and yet you survive, receive a green light to continue unscathed in something ever more loosely described as sport, surely it has to be asked, what is next on the agenda?

Boxing: Mayweather looks to Pacquiao for a truer test

It was business as usual for Floyd Mayweather on Saturday night when he went through the motions in a fight that resembled an exhibition of defensive mastery at the MGM in Las Vegas.

Boxing: Mayweather sees Marquez as way back into big time

It was inevitable that Floyd Mayweather would end his self-imposed exile from the boxing ring and equally predictable that he would control every aspect of his return to a sport that has missed him.

Boxing: Hatton tempted by Khan showdown

Ricky Hatton has given the clearest indication yet that he would be willing to fight Amir Khan, as long as he is able to promote the fight himself.

Olympic rings beckoning for the ladies who punch

Girl power is back as the fastest-growing sport in Britain heads for London 2012

Boxing: King Khan looks to America

Roach's strategy pays off as his latest world champion seeks lucrative US contests

Freddie Roach: A mastermind who turns men into champions

He has worked with 24 world title holders, and tonight in Manchester his latest charge, Amir Khan, may well become the 25th. Freddie Roach speaks to Steve Bunce about the perfect punch, Manny Pacquiao and living with Parkinson's

Boxing: California dreamin' as Khan seeks stardom in the city of angels

British lightweight seeks stardom in the city of angels but first comes Kotelnik and the business of growing up

Inside Lines: Double fault as not-so-jolly Roger dodges the bullets

The normally ebullient Roger Draper, the high-profile boss of the Lawn Tennis Association, has been keeping an uncharacteristically low profile at Wimbledon. No doubt his head is below the parapet to dodge the bullets being fired in his direction as, Andy Murray apart, the event has quickly become a Brit-free zone. Flexing new-found muscles, sports minister Gerry Sutcliffe declares himself "tired of excuses" for the perennial parade of early drop-outs and warns of funding cuts if this stone-rich sport of under-achievers does not come up to scratch. Draper's allies argue that he has only been in the job two and a half years and that his efforts need time to produce results. But Draper, probably sport's highest-paid chief executive outside top-flight football, will know he needs to justify the huge investments the LTA receives from Wimbledon, sponsors and the Government by at least getting a few more players into the world's top 150 soon. Some £27 million of funding comes via Sport England, for whom Draper was chief executive before moving to the LTA. Could another reason why he is not the usual jolly Roger these days be that, along with other senior figures who worked with the funding body, including ex-chairmen Derek Mapp, Lord Carter and Trevor Brooking, he will be asked to give evidence at the inquiry into the mystery of the secret account which operated between 1999 and 2007 to benefit minor sports, and from which almost £20m is unaccounted for? While Sport England insist no criminality is suspected, there is bound to be great embarrassment when, hopefully, all is revealed.

Inside Lines: Hitman wants another round

One look at the picture above is surely enough reason for stricken Ricky Hatton to turn it in. But his perverse pride means he is certain to fight on. The Hitman may have been hit once too often but he is determined to go out on his feet, not stretched out as he was when poleaxed by Manny Pacquiao. So expect him to make a valedictory appearance in Manchester this autumn. We hear he wants boxing's mastermind, Freddie Roach, the US trainer who plotted his frightening two-round demolition by the wondrously fast-hitting Filipino – a case of Manny hands make light work – to be in his corner. But even if they scour boxing's graveyards and dig up a convenient "body", the danger is that even a patsy could land a lucky punch against a worryingly vulnerable fighter who has finally paid the price for going more rounds in the pub than the ring. A talked-of match between Hatton and his Roach-trained pal Amir Khan might pack any arena but politically it would be hard to make and fistically it would be catastrophic for Hatton, now just a left hook away from serious long-term hurt. Let's remember him as a charismatic champion – not the Has Been Hitman. Somebody ring the bell.

James Lawton: Hatton falls short of greatness, but for him there is no shame in defeat

Yes, twice he failed, both occasions with humiliation, but he did so at the highest level

Pacquiao knocks out Hatton in round two

Manny Pacquiao enhanced his claim to being the world's best pound-for-pound boxer with a second-round knockout of Ricky Hatton on Saturday.

Inside Lines: Call for 'boycott' gives 2012 organisers shooting pains

It is the word the 2012 Games have dreaded: boycott – one which has bedevilled the Olympics over the years. Now there is talk of one in London, though thankfully not of the Games themselves but potentially damaging nonetheless.

James Lawton: How a high-school hero was blown into the eye of an economic storm

Matthew Stafford, aged 21, is a pretty decent quarterback who, back home in Texas, was a high-school star and, while never looking like the next Joe Namath or Joe Montana, did well enough for the University of Georgia's Bulldogs to finish up No 1 pick in the recent National Football League draft.

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Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
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If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable