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In pictures: some of Vanity Fair's most famous front covers

Marilyn Monroe and her literary loves

The movie star was famed for playing ditzy blondes on screen, but a new book of her writings reveals her passion for James Joyce, Walt Whitman and Samuel Beckett

Gibbons pins hopes on China orders

Stanley Gibbons posted a 10 per cent rise in profits as it pinned its hopes on an orders boost from the Chinese stamp market.

Sean O'Grady: America has become a hostage of its own quest for energy security

America faces a problem, a dilemma so fundamental that not even the political skills of Barack Obama can disguise it, heightened by, but not originating in the BP affair: She either risks her environment by drilling for more domestically sourced oil, or she accepts the need to import more from a turbulent world – jeopardising her "energy security".

The Genius & the Goddess, By Jeffrey Meyers

One of the least likely liaisons in showbiz, the marriage between Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller followed a predictable trajectory, which Jeffrey Meyers illuminates with fascinating filigree. We learn that she believed "marriage to Miller would make her a better person ".

Police apologise for loan of Robert Kennedy's clothes

Police in Los Angeles have publicly apologised for loaning the bloodstained shirt, tie and jacket that Robert F Kennedy was wearing when he was shot to organisers of a macabre exhibition at a casino in Las Vegas.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (U)

A sparkling new print of Howard Hawks's 1953 musical comedy, which paired Monroe and Russell at their spangled, curvaceous, lipsticky best.

Midsummer, Soho Theatre, London

A joyous dose of double-dealing

Tom Sutcliffe: She's almost famous

The Week In Culture

Marilyn Monroe's bra and stockings up for auction

A bra and stockings belonging to screen icon Marilyn Monroe are expected to fetch thousands when they go under the hammer this weekend.

Ulysses and Us, By Declan Kiberd

Next Tuesday marks the 105th anniversary of Bloomsday – the eventful day of 16 June 1904, on which a young aspiring writer called Stephen Dedalus, a Jewish advertising canvasser called Leopold Bloom and his adulterous songbird wife, Molly, played out a bonsai version of Homer's Odyssey in the streets of Dublin. Hundreds of Dubliners throng the streets each year, recreating the characters in costume, on stilts and in carnival floats, breakfasting near Bloom's (now demolished) home in Eccles Street, lunching on cheese sandwiches and Burgundy at Davy Byrne's pub, making the pilgrimage through the day to the cabman's shelter where Bloom and Dedalus converged after midnight.

Michael Church: The real trouble with Mendelssohn

Like Tony Curtis failing to be aroused by Marilyn’s kisses in ‘Some Like It Hot’, I’m finding the current demands that we embrace Mendelssohn as a ‘great’ composer surprisingly resistible.

The magic of Marilyn Monroe

Jazz legend Buddy Greco is auctioning rare photographs of him and the actress taken just days before she died. Andrew Johnson reports

Magnum exhibition has a taste for life

An extrodinary set of photographs will be showcased at Liberty's, with never before displayed photos from the world renowned photo agency Magnum.



Brian Viner: We are all copycat comedians

As soon as a joke is uttered on stage, it becomes public property
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones