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In pictures: some of Vanity Fair's most famous front covers

When Isak Dinesen met Marilyn Monroe

FIRST ENCOUNTERS : SOREL AND SOREL Next week: Florenz Ziegfeld and Fanny Brice

THEATRE OFFER: SEE 'DEAD FUNNY' FOR HALF PRICE

THE re-opening of Terry Johnson's Dead Funny in September was more an encore than a revival. A national tour and a change of cast apart, it has deservedly been a West End fixture (at the Vaudeville, and now the Savoy) since the end of its initial sell-out run at Hampstead Theatre in April 1994. Following the Donmar's recent revival of his 1982 play Insignificance (in which Marilyn Monroe explains relativity to Albert Einstein in a hotel bedroom), and with the imminent West End opening of Hysteria (1993) - which imagines the equally surreal meeting of Freud and Dali - Johnson, the 1994 Lloyds' Playwright of the Year, must be beside himself with mirth.

Film posters draw the collectors

FILM POSTERS sell films. But some of those for old movies now have a blockbuster value of their own. Collectors who paid pounds 12 for an original poster of the 1935 film The 39 Steps in 1978 could now sell it for pounds 7,500. That has to be classed a good investment.

THEATRE; Einstein's theory of relationships

Insignificance Donmar, London

Theatre / Seven Year Itch

First there was Some Like it Hot, then came Sunset Boulevard. It can only be a matter of time before someone decides to turn Double Indemnity into a play. Or Stalag 17. There appears to be an unwritten law that "If Billy Wilder filmed it, thou shouldst stage it". I beg to differ. The only point at which Sunset really takes off is when it most clearly reproduces the well-nigh-perfect film, so why bother? Some Like it Hot has had not one but two musical versions but no one could seriously suggest that either was an improvement on one of the most sublime screen comedies ever made.

He's Santa, God and Forrest Gump

Albert Einstein is Hollywood's favourite scientist. Great accent, strange clothes and lots of fluffy white hair. Only one problem really, says Jon Ronson - the real Einstein was too clever by half

Books: Best of both worlds

EAST, WEST by Salman Rushdie

Obituary: Tom Ewell

Yewell Tompkins (Tom Ewell), actor; born Owensboro, Kentucky 29 April 1909; twice married (one son); died Los Angeles 12 September 1994.

In Thing: Lee 101z jeans

Anyone who wears denim knows a kind of love affair exists between them and their jeans. They know which brand, label, style and size looks best, where to shop, and how long it takes to wear a pair thin. Once the ideal pair has been found, denim lovers remain forever faithful to their chosen brand. But Lee has been prizing confirmed Wrangler and Levi wearers away from their treasured denims and are now the undisputed No 2 jeans worldwide. Most stylish of their range is their very special 101z. Favourites of Marilyn Monroe and Japanese denim freaks, they're made from crispy new 'ring/ring denim and have racy yellow stitching, copper rivets, the original style U-shaped crotch and a tapered bootleg cut. They're not a new design. In fact, the 101z are the world's first zip-fly jeans and were designed in 1926. The company simply dusted off the blueprint and relaunched. Retailing at a hefty pounds 69.50, these handsome strides are being bought by London's urban cowboys and girls.

Simpson's lawyer takes off his gloves: Even before the start of the O J murder trial, the police are taking a hammering, writes Phil Reeves from Los Angeles

EVERY DAY Robert Shapiro, the 51-year-old lawyer representing O J Simpson, tugs on a pair of boxing gloves and works off his tension by pounding away at a punch bag. At present, however, he seems to be saving his most aggressive sparring for the case itself.

Image of Brazilian miners helps sale of classic agency photographs fetch pounds 90,000

A 1980s photograph by Sebastiao Salgado of workers at the Serra Pelada goldmine in Brazil which sold for pounds 1,495 during an auction at Christie's in London yesterday.

Positive thinking doesn't work: Don't be fooled: just 'feeling good about yourself' won't solve your problems, argues Linda Grant

IMAGINE this. You're a 48-year-old miner living in a Yorkshire pit village and, like everyone else you know, you've just been made redundant. You've taken to sitting about all day in your vest watching The Richard and Judy Show. Your wife has got a part-time job at McDonald's so you're also looking after the children. You start shouting at the kids and the wife and drinking too much. What's your problem? Unemployment? Extinction of the industry you've worked in all your life? Intolerable stresses caused by all of the above on family life?

Monroe haul

Clothing and other items belonging to Marilyn Monroe, missing since a burglary at a Manhattan warehouse last September, have been recovered and a suspect has been arrested, Reuter reports from New York. The items included the white halter- top dress that billowed up as she stood over a grate in the 1955 film 'The Seven Year Itch.'

FILM / Now you see them Now you don't: Bette Davis removed them. Woody Allen needs them. Marilyn Monroe steamed them up. On the nose or in the hand, glasses are the ultimate movie symbol. John Lyttle investigates

Cinema has always been the medium of spectacle. And spectacles. Glasses, face furniture, bi-focals - the movies love them. They are divine prop, handy disguise and all-purpose symbol, the one item certain to transform heart-throbs into highbrows (Cary Grant in Bringing Up Baby, Ryan O'Neal in What's Up Doc), sexpots into schoolmarms (Jennifer Jones in Good Morning Miss Dove, Susan Sarandon in The Witches of Eastwick) and Superman into a mere mortal.

Speech Marks: The things they said about . . . the actor Yves Montand

'Something of an anarchist.' Montand's schoolteacher, 1932.
Sport
Alexis Sanchez has completed a £35m move to Arsenal, the club have confirmed
sportGunners complete £35m signing of Barcelona forward
Voices
Poor teachers should be fearful of not getting pay rises or losing their job if they fail to perform, Steve Fairclough, headteacher of Abbotsholme School, suggested
voicesChris Sloggett explains why it has become an impossible career path
Sport
world cup 2014
Sport
Ray Whelan was arrested earlier this week
Arts and Entertainment
In a minor key: Keira Knightley in the lightweight 'Begin Again'
film
Arts and Entertainment
Celebrated children’s author Allan Ahlberg, best known for Each Peach Pear Plum
books
News
peopleIndian actress known as the 'Grand Old Lady of Bollywood' was 102
News
Wayne’s estate faces a claim for alleged copyright breaches
newsJohn Wayne's heirs duke it out with university over use of the late film star's nickname
Life and Style
It beggars belief: the homeless and hungry are weary, tortured, ghosts of people – with bodies contorted by imperceptible pain
lifeRough sleepers exist in every city. Hear the stories of those whose luck has run out
News
Mick Jagger performing at Glastonbury
people
Career Services

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