News According to reports, federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty against Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

The twin blasts killed three people and wounded more than 260 others at the end of the city's marathon in April 2013

Steve Connor: Spreading a little sunshine for the dawn of a new age

It is fair to say that without photosynthesis life on Earth would be very different. It is arguably the most critical biological process. It has allowed life to flourish but it is also the basis of advanced, industrialised societies which are built on the energy of fossil fuels stored in the ground. Plants have developed a form of energy conversion that scientists would love to emulate. Using a pigment, chlorophyll, and a sophisticated bagfull of enzymes called a chloroplast, plants are able to convert the energy of the sun, and the carbon dioxide of the air, into a chemical fuel that can be stored as a fossil fuel for millions of years.

GM viruses offer hope of future where energy is unlimited

Breakthrough as US researchers replicate photosynthesis in laboratory

Marketing multi-touch technology

Entrepreneur Ralph Cochrane wants to go to LA to market the multi-touch technology produced by his company, www.touch-it.com

Hard science and soft humanity: At home with Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan's new novel, Solar, satirises the low compulsions of an absurd scientist but celebrates the high aims of scientific research. Boyd Tonkin meets the 'imaginative rationalist' of British literature

Errors & Omissions: Those rampaging nouns have been on the loose again

The 1960 science-fiction novel A Canticle for Leibowitz concerns a community of Latin-speaking monks surviving in an America devastated by nuclear war.

Batteries: The power behind the phone

Our gadgets are more advanced than ever. But the batteries that charge them use 200-year-old technology – and the strain is starting to show, says Simon Usborne

A technological powerhouse to rival MIT and Oxbridge

The French are waking the sleeping giant

Under the weather? Just swallow a doctor

The day when patients can “swallow their doctor” has come a step closer with the development of a submicroscopic nanoparticle that acts as an intelligent pill to deliver drugs when and where they are needed in the body.

Americans dare to hope for a happier 2010

First data of new year suggests recovery is on track but job fears persist

Letters: Fate of Gary McKinnon

Why have ministers failed to help Gary McKinnon?

Paul Samuelson: Nobel Prize-winner widely regarded as the most important economist of the 20th century

At precisely eight in the morning of 2 January, 1932, a brilliant first-year student, aged just 16, wandered into a lecture on Thomas Malthus at the University of Chicago – and in his own words, "was born again as an economist." Thus began the career of Paul Samuelson, arguably the most important, and certainly the most widely read, academic economist of the 20th century.

Nobel economist Samuelson dies, aged 94

Economist Paul Samuelson, who won a Nobel Prize for his effort to bring mathematical analysis into economics and helped shape tax policy for President Kennedy, has died at home aged 94.

Barack Obama: Renewable energies will drive the renewal of American pride

The Pentagon has declared our dependence on fossil fuels a security threat. Veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are travelling the country as part of Operation Free, campaigning to end our dependence on oil. Leaders in the business community are standing with leaders in the environmental community to protect the economy and the planet we leave for our children. The House of Representatives has already passed historic legislation.

3D printers: Super models

They can make detailed replicas of anything from your unborn child to an active volcano in moments. So, asks Tim Walker, how long will it be before there's a 3D printer on every desk?

Will Ed Miliband eclipse brother David?

The younger Miliband spoke to the TUC – with many insiders believing he may overtake David to the leadership
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
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Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
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exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
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Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
comedyAs ‘Luxury Comedy’ returns, Noel Fielding on why mainstream success scares him and what the future holds for 'The Boosh'
Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
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'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
musicHis latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do our experts think he’s missed out?
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New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
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Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
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booksThe best children's books for this summer
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn