News According to reports, federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty against Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

The twin blasts killed three people and wounded more than 260 others at the end of the city's marathon in April 2013

Steve Connor: Spreading a little sunshine for the dawn of a new age

It is fair to say that without photosynthesis life on Earth would be very different. It is arguably the most critical biological process. It has allowed life to flourish but it is also the basis of advanced, industrialised societies which are built on the energy of fossil fuels stored in the ground. Plants have developed a form of energy conversion that scientists would love to emulate. Using a pigment, chlorophyll, and a sophisticated bagfull of enzymes called a chloroplast, plants are able to convert the energy of the sun, and the carbon dioxide of the air, into a chemical fuel that can be stored as a fossil fuel for millions of years.

GM viruses offer hope of future where energy is unlimited

Breakthrough as US researchers replicate photosynthesis in laboratory

Marketing multi-touch technology

Entrepreneur Ralph Cochrane wants to go to LA to market the multi-touch technology produced by his company, www.touch-it.com

Hard science and soft humanity: At home with Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan's new novel, Solar, satirises the low compulsions of an absurd scientist but celebrates the high aims of scientific research. Boyd Tonkin meets the 'imaginative rationalist' of British literature

Errors & Omissions: Those rampaging nouns have been on the loose again

The 1960 science-fiction novel A Canticle for Leibowitz concerns a community of Latin-speaking monks surviving in an America devastated by nuclear war.

Batteries: The power behind the phone

Our gadgets are more advanced than ever. But the batteries that charge them use 200-year-old technology – and the strain is starting to show, says Simon Usborne

A technological powerhouse to rival MIT and Oxbridge

The French are waking the sleeping giant

Under the weather? Just swallow a doctor

The day when patients can “swallow their doctor” has come a step closer with the development of a submicroscopic nanoparticle that acts as an intelligent pill to deliver drugs when and where they are needed in the body.

Americans dare to hope for a happier 2010

First data of new year suggests recovery is on track but job fears persist

Letters: Fate of Gary McKinnon

Why have ministers failed to help Gary McKinnon?

Paul Samuelson: Nobel Prize-winner widely regarded as the most important economist of the 20th century

At precisely eight in the morning of 2 January, 1932, a brilliant first-year student, aged just 16, wandered into a lecture on Thomas Malthus at the University of Chicago – and in his own words, "was born again as an economist." Thus began the career of Paul Samuelson, arguably the most important, and certainly the most widely read, academic economist of the 20th century.

Nobel economist Samuelson dies, aged 94

Economist Paul Samuelson, who won a Nobel Prize for his effort to bring mathematical analysis into economics and helped shape tax policy for President Kennedy, has died at home aged 94.

Barack Obama: Renewable energies will drive the renewal of American pride

The Pentagon has declared our dependence on fossil fuels a security threat. Veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are travelling the country as part of Operation Free, campaigning to end our dependence on oil. Leaders in the business community are standing with leaders in the environmental community to protect the economy and the planet we leave for our children. The House of Representatives has already passed historic legislation.

3D printers: Super models

They can make detailed replicas of anything from your unborn child to an active volcano in moments. So, asks Tim Walker, how long will it be before there's a 3D printer on every desk?

Will Ed Miliband eclipse brother David?

The younger Miliband spoke to the TUC – with many insiders believing he may overtake David to the leadership
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent