News According to reports, federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty against Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

The twin blasts killed three people and wounded more than 260 others at the end of the city's marathon in April 2013

Father of the Internet

Imagine that a decade ago you had invented the World Wide Web. By now you would be a billionaire of Bill Gates proportions, right? Wrong. Tamsin Todd talks to Tim Berners-Lee, the unassuming Englishman who created the Web and remains true to its non-proprietary principles

On your wavelength

Don't thump your PC when it crashes, just frown at it. In the future, says HESTER LACEY, your computer will tune into your mood

Network: The secret of Silicon Valley? We all have an axe to grind

I'M SITTING in the Silicon Valley morning-commute traffic on Sand Hill Road, thinking about the Internet and life. My morning paper had seen fit to headline a story "Internet: dream or nightmare?", and started my internal wheels turning.

Brain divides to perform maths

PEOPLE USE one of two distinct parts of the brain to perform mathematical tasks, depending on whether they are making exact calculations or rough estimates. Scientists have found that one of the brain regions is linked closely with language and is good for precise calculations while the other is better at estimating numbers using more visual information.

Education: Your views: The Prof must look deeper

In his inaugural speech Professor Cannadine did not mention, let alone propose, a new "University of Bloomsbury". However, Birkbeck would oppose any proposal that ignores the transformation of the University of London from a massive, clumsy, centralised system to a flourishing federation. The best way to strengthen our excellence in the humanities and in other areas is to build upon our ability to offer joint London degrees and create even more research alliances between the colleges. The history of successful US institutions, such as MIT or Harvard, provides no evidence for arbitrarily merging physically proximate institutions.

Organs grown in the lab

REPLACEMENT BODY parts might one day be grown in the laboratory, solving the shortage of donor organs for transplant, an expert said yesterday.

Academia - a case of US and them

The leading historian David Cannadine warned last night that British universities have fallen way behind American ones: chronically underfunded, their academics are less confident, creative or imaginative.

The secret of genius is very hard work

Mathematical Notes

Obituary: Professor Henry W. Kendall

HENRY W. KENDALL, together with his colleagues Richard E. Taylor and Jerome I. Friedman, won the 1990 Nobel Prize in Physics for experiments which proved the existence of fundamental building bricks, called quarks, as constituents of the neutron and proton of everyday matter.

World's oldest rocks found in Canada

THEY MAY look like a pile of old rubble, but for geologists the grey-black stones found inCanada have turned out to be the oldest rocks in the world.

Microchip could replace medicine

AMERICAN SCIENTISTS are developing a "smart" tablet - a microchip packed with drugs rather than data - to replace painful injections, bulky pills and foul-tasting medicines.

Giant sea gates can save Venice

EXPERTS FROM the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say the only way to save Venice from high tides are giant flood gates.

Obituary: Jon Postel

THE COMPUTER scientist Jon Postel was one of the "fathers of the Internet".

Obituary: Professor William E. Griffith

"ZBIG'S IDEA man" was how one White House aide described William E. Griffith when he worked as an adviser to President Jimmy Carter's national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski.

Heart fear for dieters' drug

SMITHKLINE BEECHAM and Medeva, two of the UK's leading pharmaceutical groups, were locked in a bitter row last night with two US researchers who have alleged that one of their diet drugs could cause heart and lung problems.
News
Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own