News According to reports, federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty against Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

The twin blasts killed three people and wounded more than 260 others at the end of the city's marathon in April 2013

In the time it's taken politicians to throw up a road block, an MIT professor has invented a new encryption technology

Politics and technology are becoming increasingly intertwined. Which is to be expected: technology has created great wealth in some places, and money is the most potent of political lures.

Science: BYTE COUTURE

Is that 64 megabytes in your pocket, or are you just pleased to see me? Advances in technology mean computers are more portable than ever. Roger Dobson reports on the latest softwear

Whose fingers on the button?

Digital technology will shape learning in the future, and as many children are already computer virtuosos, they will have the power to influence the direction of their own education, says Seymour Papert

Four years of speculation? We'll all be nervous wrecks

the risks for sterling as it waits on the sidelines of the single currency

Iron lung gives lab mice a new lease of life - but not for long

Roger Dobson on how experiments on mice can now be extended

Letter: Protecting Venice

Protecting Venice

Net gains: As you like it

I don't know if somebody has sat down and worked out exactly how many words are floating around on the Internet these days, but it must run into hundreds of billions. Unfortunately, not many of them are worth reading. However, now that computers can cope with shifting huge chunks of text around with relative ease, it doesn't take Sherlock Holmes to work out that somebody would start sticking classic literature on the Internet.

Pentagon hackers caught in cyberspace

AN ISRAELI teenager is under house arrest accused of carrying out the most sustained and successful attack ever on the computer system of the Pentagon.

The digital revolution: Put away that Filofax. Pick up that palmtop. Get with it

Times are hard at Filofax Group. Yesterday executives at the company were surely flicking through their hand-tooled leather binders, seeking the names of companies or firms or friends or (who knows?) people they might have met once on a plane who would be interested in buying all or part of the company, or getting together for a "strategic alliance" (business-speak for rescue) or joint venture (business-speak for an escape hatch).

The computer that can hack into your emotions

FRUSTRATED? Angry? No one understands you? Never mind, get a computer. Computers are being taught to sense different human emotions.

Lego's intelligent bricks put power in children's hands

New Lego bricks containing programmable microchips went on show yesterday.After 30 years of work by American researchers, children (well, those whose parents have a PC and pounds 150 to spare) will soon be able to buy and program the "intelligent bricks" to create self-propelling robots able to follow trails, move towards or away from light, and navigate through unfamiliar territory.

Lego goes hi-tech with a chip in the old brick

THAT most traditional of children's toys, the Lego building brick, is about to make a dramatic move into the age of technology. A new Lego brick, which can be fitted with a microchip, will enable children to create robots and moving dinosaurs, cars and elevators, writes Colin Blackstock.

Science: Men with our thoughts on their minds

Our minds work the way they do because we have inherited our ancestors' genes, and the brain is an organ designed for computation. Steven Pinker explains his determinist vision to Jerome Burne, while Steven Rose argues that it's all a bit more complicated than that.

Weather: Outwitted by Inuit - the Eskimo snow mystery resolved

Eskimos do not have 200 different words for snow. Nor 100, 48, nine or even seven, though all these figures have been quoted by different sources. The real answer is two, as

Women, like men, can help acting on impulse

Behaving badly in Basildon
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine