Memphis

Ask the traveller: Work in the US

Your last point excludes a couple of the more obvious targets – New York City and San Francisco are fabulous locations, with great connections, but rent costs and other living expenses are punishingly high.

Ballydoyle land clean sweep of Curragh riches with Treasure

So no change there, then. The dominance by Aidan O'Brien and the Coolmore Stud owner partnerships of the elite Irish racing scene, and of their country's premier Classic in particular, continued yesterday when Treasure Beach became the sixth successive Irish Derby winner, and the ninth in all, to emerge from Ballydoyle.

O'Brien settles on Derby quartet

Yesterday was a time for some i-dotting and t-crossing, and a little head-scratching, in mission control at Ballydoyle. In the morning, Aidan O'Brien's squad for the Derby was finalised; a quartet – Seville, Recital, Treasure Beach and Memphis Tennessee – is set to challenge for the £1.25m Investec-sponsored purse at Epsom on Saturday, with another who might have done so, Roderic O'Connor, heading for the Prix du Jockey-Club at Chantilly the following day.

New Orleans: Decadence and drama in the Delta

Tennessee Williams, who was born 100 years ago today, drew inspiration from the characters who lived in America's Deep South. Chris Coplans follows in the playwright's footsteps

Nashville: My new spiritual home

Last time I went to Nashville it was in the 1980s and I couldn’t see any way past the Randy Travis tea towels and the Dollywood-ification of the place.

Alex Chilton: Singer and guitarist with the power-pop pioneers Big

The Memphis-born singer and guitarist Alex Chilton disproved the theory that there are no second acts in popular music. As a teenager with a raspy voice that belied his years, he fronted the 1960s blue-eyed soul group The Boxtops and scored worldwide hits with "The Letter", "Cry Like A Baby" and "Soul Deep". In the early '70s he formed Big Star, who distilled the British-invasion sound of The Beatles and the Byrds' jingle-jangle, and invented the power pop genre.

Album: Tindersticks, Falling Down a Mountain (4AD)

Stuart A Staples is a man whose distinctive nasal Nottingham mumble merges with that of Harold Wilson with every new Tindersticks record. Falling Down a Mountain, remains on familiar Nashville-on-Trent ground.

More headlines

The Small Faces - a fanbase that's alive and kicking

It’s more than 18 years since Steve Marriott died after fire swept through his 16th century Essex home and yet, with the help of Facebook, the greatest of mod icons has become a hero to a fanbase more international than he ever had when he was alive.

Re-living the dream

A shocking new play set on the eve of Martin Luther King's assassination will reveal some uncomfortable truths about the man behind the myth.