News A heroin user prepares the drug in Zhukovsky, near Moscow

Seventeen-year-old told doctors she had been using the drug for two months

City Life Mexico city: Strong arm of the law hits Aztec temple

WHEN A drunken policeman apparently misunderstood the concept of a flyover and launched his car some 25 feet through the air last weekend to crash land on a stone ceremonial platform beside the Templo Mayor in the heart of Mexico City, the public was absolutely horrified.

Travel: Ten Years After

HOW THE WORLD HAS CHANGED

An all-women force drives corruption off the roads: City Life: Mexico City

TRAFFIC TAILBACKS are one of the torments of driving in Mexico City, swarming with more than 3.5 million registered vehicles. To many traffic police, each idling car represents an opportunity. For a small payment, called a mordida or little bite, they can choose not to write out violations and are quite happy to pocket the change.

City Life: Mexico City - All-women force drives away traffic corruption

TRAFFIC TAILBACKS are one of the torments of driving in Mexico City, swarming with more than 3.5 million registered vehicles. To many traffic police, each idling car represents an opportunity. For a small payment, called a mordida or little bite, they can choose not to write out violations and are quite happy to pocket the change.

Short Breaks: 48 hours in Mexico City

Its history is a mad mix of Trotsky and Aztec - all the more reason to visit.

All things being unequal

AN INTERESTING chart jumped out at me from the pages of the New York Times the other day. It ranked six countries according to the distribution of income. Of the six, Britain was ranked most equitable, Brazil the least and the United States came about halfway in between.

Women get a taste for the `Full Enchilada'

THE SHRIEKS of 2,500 ecstatic women penetrate the theatre walls and are audible over the Mexico City traffic. The posters promise "a show that awakens the deepest, darkest thoughts of women", but 10 television stars moonlighting as male strippers have gone beyond their brief to spark a cultural revolution across Mexico. In a low blow to machismo, ordinary Mexican women by the thousand defy the objections of husbands, brothers and priests and come to gawk at the bared bodies of some of the best known Latino faces.

City Life: Mexico City - Urchins in mourning for their manic street preacher

SAN JERONIMITO is a grotty little church from the outside, with half a dozen gang signatures spray- painted in neon colours half way up its stucco walls.

Student Sport: Britons finding graduation tough at World Games

AFTER 10 days of competition, of toil, sweat, tears and some blood, the British team was still waiting for its first gold medal of the 20th World Student Games here. Clearly, the messages are that the competitions here are by no means second rate and that if you have the ability to be a world student champion, the chances are that come next September you will be up there when the medals are handed out at the Sydney Olympics.

Earthquake hits central Mexico

Soldiers tear down the remains of a home destroyed in the central Mexican town of San Mateo Ozolco after an earthquake hit central Mexico, killing at least 16 and

City Life Mexico City: Saucy dancing offers a whirlwind cure for jetlag

MY SHORT-TERM solution for coping with an abrupt move halfway round the globe, from Delhi to Mexico City, is simply to stick with my old timetable and avoid jetlag. Staying up all night and sleeping in is easy if, like Mexico's energetic night crowd, you go to a salsa club.

Mean streets

The streets of Mexico City are home to thousands of destitute children whose lives are marred by drug addiction, sickness, and abuse by the police. Over a period of 10 years, the photographer Kent Klich has moved among them and captured their lives on film. Words by Jonathan Dyson

Right of Reply: Michael Horovitz

An ex-beatnik answers Alex Webb's misrepresentation of Jack Kerouac and the Beats

Rough Guide: Mandarin trees, mummies and sleepy monarchs

John Fisher and Alex Robinson, co-authors of the 'Rough Guide to Mexico', recall their best and worst finds
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?