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The striker refused to play for Stoke after texting manager Mark Hughes

Capital Gains: Fatal attraction of sex and shopping

Gorgeous, pouting Mark has worked at the chi-chi Gianfranco Ferre shop in Knightsbridge for six months. His sensual looking bluejohn eyes bat at the very suggestion that flirting with the customers might quicken both sales and the working day. Heavens, as if he would. It isn't his fault that he's an Adonis among men, is it? Did he ask for a jaw this square, place an order for cheekbones this high? No. He modestly sees a liking for people, an enthusiasm for clothes and 'an enormous amount of patience as the best tools for the job. He doesn't need to flirt.

CSA chief 'asked official to lure women for him': Employee denies having 'fatal attraction' for sacked manager

A WOMAN accused of sexually harassing her boss at the Child Support Agency claimed yesterday that he used her to lure women for him at CSA functions.

Life sentence for woman in 'fatal attraction' case: Divorcee recruited her 16-year-old son to murder love rival

A DIVORCEE with a 'fatal attraction and obsession' for her married driving instructor was jailed for life yesterday after being convicted of murdering her rival in love.

SPEECH MARKS / The things they say about . . . Michael Winner

Hannibal Brooks, 1968: 'Some passable sequences.' Halliwell's Film Guide.

Profile: Do we love him when he's angry?: Michael Douglas, up there doing it for urban man

Falling Down, starring Michael Douglas, the actor who runs the gauntlet of every modern trauma, is one of those films that provoked many column inches of priceless controversy in America. It is about to come to a cinema near you. Its protagonist, D-Fens (after the acronym on his customised licence plate), a redundant defence industry worker, roams the mean fast-food joints and ethnic neighbourhoods of a Los Angeles sunk in crime, drugs, traffic, pollution and economic recession. D-Fens is furious at what modern life confronts him with; a decent man unhinged by urban angst, white middle-class male under siege. Humiliated and frustrated at every turn, he picks up his baseball bat, automatic rifle and grenade launcher and goes on the rampage. He gives beggars a verbal savaging, goes nuclear with a Korean shopkeeper, is at dirty war with the wife.

CINEMA / Confused, meaningless, racist and dangerous

IN Falling Down (18), Michael Douglas's face starts out a smarting crimson - a medium rare that gets better done the worse he does. We open so tight on his nose the camera seems about to tumble down a pore, before widening out to take in the full, livid mug. The thin lips turned into a downward crescent; the steady, resentful gaze. Meet D-Fens, a character to whom you may already feel too close for comfort. On the soundtrack, even before the pictures come up, we hear a deep breath. It's about the only one he takes: his fuse is measured in millimetres.

FILM / We're not gonna take it any more: Falling Down, Joel Schumacher's journey into Taxi Driver and Network territory

Films that tell us everything stinks (if we were programming a retrospective we'd call it the Cinema of Grievance) are relatively rare - perhaps because feel-good Hollywood discriminates against the downbeat, perhaps because such films come from an unusual combination of impulses: a willingness to notice social misery plus a refusal of the politics that might begin to explain it. The world is a rotten place and nothing can be done - which is paradoxically a comforting thought. The result tends to be a visual rant, a hysterical presentation of evidence seeking to justify an inarticulate rage that already exists, and may actually have other causes.

FILM / Damaged goods in the shop window: He's upset America's Hispanics and Koreans, and he's not exactly the toast of Los Angeles. Is Joel Schumacher sorry? Is he hell. Sheila Johnston reports

Joel Schumacher must be the only former professional window dresser to be invited to Cannes to present his film in competition, although sharp-eyed observers might have detected an early vocation from the kind of window displays he created (this was back in the Sixties, remember, when conspicuous consumption was rampant enough for stores to be, like, subtle about selling).

Award that suit an Oscar: Meet the real star of Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct and now Indecent Proposal . . . Nino Cerruti. Roger Tredre reports

THE NEW Adrian Lyne film, Indecent Proposal, released next week in which Demi Moore plays a married woman offered dollars 1m to sleep with well- bred billionaire Robert Redford, has been talked about for all the wrong reasons. Never mind that tricky moral dilemma, and the gravity-

FILM / To love, honour and dismay: She stands by her man. She keeps the family together. She is patronised by both screen husband and screenwriter. She does what she's told. John Lyttle on the roles of the Hollywood wife

Now is not a pleasant time to be a woman in mainstream movies. Consider the suspiciously similar plights of actresses Sarah Jessica Parker, Uma Thurman and Demi Moore. In Honeymoon in Vegas, Parker is the card game prize James Caan 'borrows' from loser Nicolas Cage. Mad Dog and Glory sees Thurman out on loan from Bill Murray to Robert De Niro. As feminists have noted, two's company, three's a trend. Indecent Proposal, out next week, completes the menage a trois and has proved the most controversial of the trio. And for one almost insultingly simple reason. Unlike Parker and Thurman, Demi Moore plays the Good Wife.

FILM / Base instincts with a low body count: Body of Evidence (18) Uli Edel (US); Dust Devil (18) Richard Stanley (UK/US)

EVERYONE involved in Body of Evidence is at pains to underline the project's artistic integrity. 'I am a great admirer of the courtroom genre,' says the director, Uli Edel. And Willem Dafoe has declared himself attracted by the prospect of wearing a suit in the movie - 'that'll be fun' - and of having a kid - 'that'll be fun.' And the explicit sex scenes with Madonna? 'That'll be interesting,' Dafoe admitted, almost as an afterthought.

White men can't dance - but they can still get angry

'WHO LOVES YA, baby?' Kojak might have asked when he was the Queen's favourite television character. Well, if you are white and male, probably nobody very much.

Screen violence: the tide turns: The Hollywood dream factory is now a nightmare, say critics who accuse it of peddling horrific brutality. Cal McCrystal reports

Hollywood has always fed off itself. In recent years the feeding has been of a particularly graphic kind: Robert DeNiro biting off a woman's cheek in Cape Fear; Anthony Hopkins biting off his victims' faces in The Silence of the Lambs. Questions arise. Is Hollywood trying to turn us all into cannibals? Will 'Eat thy neighbour' become a tenet of our society?

FILM / The bare necessities of life: The flesh is weak, but its appeal at the box-office is stronger than ever. John Lyttle offers a scene by scene guide to movie seduction

Sex at the movies doesn't always happen in the back row. Since the Sixties Louis B Mayer's catch-all dictum 'Don't show the bodily functions]' has been discarded in favour of ever more graphic D-I-Y kits showing the public how to assemble the two-backed beast. More and more often 'it' is laid bare across the Silver Screen, in close-up, moans, groans, goosebumps, ice-picks, extras and all.
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World's most lethal spider found under a bunch of bananas

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<p>Jonathan Ross</p>
<p>Jonathan Ross (or Wossy, as he’s affectionately known) has been on television and radio for an extraordinarily long time, working on a seat in the pantheon of British presenters. Hosting Friday Night with Jonathan Ross for nine years, Ross has been in everything from the video game Fable to Phineas and Ferb. So it’s probably not so surprising that Ross studied at Southampton College of Art (since rebranded Southampton Solent), a university known nowadays for its media production courses.</p>
<p>However, after leaving Solent, Ross studied History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of the UCL, a move that was somewhat out of keeping with the rest of his career. Ross was made a fellow of the school in 2006 in recognition of his services to broadcasting.</p>
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Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past