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Why sloths descend from the safety of the trees once a week to go to the toilet has baffled scientists - but one specialist thinks he has the answer

The British Association for the Advancement of Science: First photographs of 'impossible' crystal

A CRYSTAL with a five-fold symmetry, a structure scientists had thought was impossible, photographed by a team from the Natural History Museum in London, which made the discovery. It believes the photographs of the structure are a first.

Wimpey builds profit on housing recovery

A SHARP recovery in profits from the housing division helped Wimpey back into the black in the six months to June. Confirmation of persistently difficult construction markets and a flat dividend, however, pushed the shares 2p lower to 163p.

Asbestos verdict

AN inquest returned an open verdict on Mary Herridge, 76, of Ryde, Isle of Wight, who died from the asbestos related disease mesothelioma, 70 years after she was exposed to the dust when she played outside the Roberts asbestos textile factory in Armley, Leeds.

T&N welcomes American ruling on asbestos deal

T&N, the engineering and motor components group, said a US court ruling on settlement of asbestos illness claims would cause a fall of about 50 per cent in the charges it has been making to cover asbestos-related costs over the next five years.

Where Shall We Meet?: Sherlock Holmes Hotel

Two and a half million people go to Madame Tussauds every year. Why is their business. Assuming that you will not be joining your pet tourist on this particular jaunt you had better take not the first, not the second but the third cab you see to Dr Watson's bar in the nearby Sherlock Holmes Hotel in Baker Street. The walls are decorated with gushing letters from satisfied customers. They can't have used the bar is all I can say. Service is elementary. Spirits pounds 2.50, minerals pounds 1. No wine: 'This isn't a wine bar. The nuts may well be very nice. They never arrived. They are, however, very liberal with the bookmatches which are adorned with a silhouette of the Great Detective and make nice kitsch souvenirs. Pub hours.

Bottom Line: McAlpine plays safe

RAISING pounds 25m for housing land makes sense for McAlpine - it is the only area of the business showing life. The company is also right not to push its luck with a bigger issue, although its high gearing suggests it ought to, with the sector so out of favour.

Chatset more optimistic

CHATSET, the Lloyd's of London insurance market analyst, today will announce revised predictions for the market's 1991 year of account losses to be announced next week. Instead of a pounds 3bn loss Chatset is now expecting nearer to pounds 2.5bn.

Bottom Line: Little power in Wimpey's bounce

A BOUNCE from losses of pounds 112m to a pounds 26m profit looked impressive, but it included almost pounds 10m of non-repeatable items, and an initial 5p rise in Wimpey's shares was soon replaced by a 9p fall to 209p.

Wimpey reverses three-year downturn

George Wimpey, Britain's second- biggest housebuilder, returned to the black in the year to December, benefiting from a 41 per cent increase in house sales and a reduction in costs in construction and minerals.

Bottom Line: ECC confidence looks well placed

ANDREW TEARE, chief executive of English China Clays, is clearly wary of making himself a hostage to fortune. He eschews promises of unlocking shareholder value in his explanation of the planned demerger of the building materials business. Instead, he says, the rationale is to create two more focused businesses.

Health Update: Asthma linked to poor diet

DIET, rather than pollution, could be the chief cause of the increase in asthma among children over the past 20 years, claim researchers from the University Medical School and Rowett Research Institute, Aberdeen. Between 1961 and 1985 the consumption of fresh fruit, vegetables, fish and meat fell significantly, they say. These foods are valuable sources of vitamins and minerals essential for the lungs' defence mechanisms, the researchers argue in Thorax, and low intake raises susceptibility to pollutants and allergens.

Alfred McAlpine shares leap on boost for housing: Disappointing results from minerals and US

SHARES in Alfred McAlpine continued their recent surge, closing 35p higher at 329p after the housebuilder and construction company announced a 43 per cent rise in underlying profits.

SCIENCE / The Great Unsolved Mysteries - Out of the black smoker: 5. The origins of life: Life began on Earth between 3.5 and four billion years ago - but how? Primitive forms probably originated in undersea volcanoes, but what actually got them going? Steve Connor follows the theories from primordial soup to outer space to crystals

GO BACK in time to the dawn of creation, more than four billion years ago, when the Earth was a vast cauldron of volcanic matter. The planet was under intense and destructive bombardment from giant meteorites. There were no oceans and no life.

Staveley sounds growth warning as profits slip

STAVELEY, the measuring equipment and engineering group that also owns British Salt, announced an 18 per cent fall in pre-tax profits for the six months to October and warned that the full-year result is unlikely to be up on last year, writes Tom Stevenson.

City File: Dia Met and Lytton Minerals

AMONG the victims of the great gold ramp earlier this year were Dia Met and Lytton Minerals, two of the smaller companies in the diamond rush in the Canadian Arctic. This is no pipe-dream, for it already involves RTZ, De Beers and Dia Met's backer, the Australian mining giant BHP. First results were highly promising but the gold-share rush cooled enthusiasm.
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Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
In pictures: Breathtaking results of this weekend's 'supermoon'

Weekend's 'supermoon' in pictures

The moon appeared bigger and brighter at the weekend
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor