News David Cameron with democracy leader Aung SanSuu Kyi in her garden yesterday

PM dismisses warnings of false dawn with call to 'suspend' sanctions, at house where heroine was held for 15 years

Plantation linked to junta is 'destroying' Burmese tiger reserve

The world's largest tiger reserve, in the wilds of northern Burma, is being rapidly eroded as a businessman with links to the junta replaces trees with cash crops, according to a report published yesterday.

Emmanouil Athanasiou: The long arm of human rights law is the only thing that will frighten the generals into change

For the first time in 45 years, the international community is coming around to the view that justice must be available to the victims of Burma's military regime. UN bodies, NGOs and independent experts have documented a pattern of appalling and systematic human rights violations including summary executions, torture, forced labour, mass rape and the recruitment of child soldiers. These acts clearly constitute crimes against humanity under the statute that established the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Obama wants Burmese rulers to face UN war crimes investigation

US move reflects the failure of engagement with Rangoon

Burma names the date for discredited vote

Burma's ruling junta set Sunday 7 November as the date for the country's first election in two decades yesterday, but made no concessions to critics who say the rules favour the army and its allies and bar the democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi from taking part.

Leading article: Burma's election that is no election

The western media tend to have a Pavlovian response to the word "election", and now that Burma has announced that its first general election for 20 years will be held on 7 November, journalists masquerading as tourists will doubtless soon be hacking through the country's highways and byways, asking about voter preferences, profiling party leaders and ruminating on the outcome.

Man on the Move, By Otto de Kat, trs Sam Garrett

This is a short, thoughtful novel, the first 40 pages of which wind the spring which powers the rest. We learn of Rob, a 22-year-old Dutchman who emigrates in 1935. The next 10 years of his life are glimpsed in a quick-fire series of broken pictures: parting from his family, a brief stint in the diamond mines of Johannesburg, and his time working on the Burma Railway as a prisoner of war in Thailand.

India welcomes Burmese general with open arms

India welcomed the head of Burma's isolated military government yesterday, despite international criticism and extended aid to the regime for railroad and agriculture projects, as New Delhi competes to assert its influence in the region.

Tory leader follows Burmese general on the Delhi trail

Burma's top military general began a five-day visit to India yesterday for talks aimed at deepening ties between the two South Asian neighbours. Pro-democracy advocates protested his arrival and promised to step up their demonstrations.

Benedict Rogers: Delhi risks finding itself on the wrong side of history

That General Than Shwe, one of the world's most brutal dictators, is visiting the world's largest democracy, India, is ironic but unsurprising. Over the past two decades, Than Shwe has carefully developed relations with his neighbour.

Andrew Buncombe: Hold the front page - Good news from Burma

One of the obvious advantages of our online age is that it is not only bad news that spreads its way around the world in a matter of seconds.

Burma's paranoid dictator plots his dignified exit

Senior-General Than Shwe is giving his regime a makeover as he calculates the safest way to step down. Peter Popham reports

Burma bans marching and chanting during rallies

Political parties seeking to contest elections due to be held in Burma later this year have been told they will not be able to march, chant or say anything during rallies that is judged to have the potential to damage the country’s image.

Aung San Suu Kyi's desperate plea to the world

As Aung San Suu Kyi prepares to celebrate her 65th birthday tomorrow, confined in the house in which she has spent most of the past two decades, a confidante of the Burmese opposition leader has made a simple but passionate appeal to those in the West to use their freedom to help his country achieve the same.

A birthday party without the star guest

One thing is certain about Aung San Suu Kyi's 65th birthday tomorrow – it will rain. This is the monsoon season in Burma and each day brings a torrential downpour. After years of decline, her dilapidated lakeside villa in Rangoon – where she has spent 15 of the last 21 years under house arrest – is finally being renovated.

Mary Robinson: We are walking a long road to peace and freedom

My fellow Elders and I place an empty chair for Aung San Suu Kyi at all of our meetings. We drape the chair in Burmese silk as a reminder not only of her continued suffering, but of that of more than 2,100 other political prisoners in Burma.

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