New Zealander declared Mr Gay World

New Zealand's Andreas Derleth has been crowned Mr Gay World, after a contest in Johannesburg that organisers said aimed to challenge homophobia throughout Africa.

General Magnus Malan: Feared and notorious politician who waged a

The death of Magnus Malan marks the passing of one of the most powerful and notorious leaders of the apartheid era. To his enemies, he was a figure of fear and hatred – one of the monsters of an evil system; to his colleagues and subordinates he was a figure of awe – the general who reorganised the military and then reorganised the country along military lines.

Namibia: A wildlife safari in the Kunene region offers substance over

Russell Vinjevold, our guide, broke into the soppiest of smiles. "Will you just look at that little chap!" To many bush-hardened southern Africans, a baby elephant sheltering under its mother's belly is not necessarily something to get gooey about. After all, many parts of Africa have more elephants than they can handle, and tiny, shy, week-old babies with improbably delicate-looking trunks soon grow into tree-wreckers.

Traveller's guide: Family safaris

If you get the details right, a trip to view Africa's amazing wildlife can be the ultimate adventure for parents and children, says Mike Unwin

Where the weird things are: Meet the pangolin, the mammal that thinks

A 15kg walking artichoke? A metre-long ant-eating pine cone? Even though the pangolin is fairly widespread in savannah woodland right across sub-Saharan Africa, it's hard to describe in animal terms. For a start, this bizarre mammal is the only warm-blooded creature on the planet that is completely covered in scales.

Jacques Burger: the new toughest guy in rugby?

As the Namibian enforcer takes on top-of-the-table Northampton, he speaks to Chris Hewett about how he came to Saracens and why he intends to till 14,000 acres back home when he retires

David Soggot: Lawyer who fought for justice in apartheid-era Namibia

David Soggot's induction into the political life of the colony of South West Africa (now Namibia) was brutal and bloody. It was 1973, and the Anglican suffragan bishop in Windhoek, Richard Wood, unable to find a local lawyer to act on behalf of Swapo nationalists being flogged by South Africa's black quislings, had telephoned the human rights advocate in Johannesburg."I'll be on the next plane," was the response.

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