Native Americans

Invisible Ink: No 182 - Willa Cather

When Dorothy got home to Kansas it always seemed to me she'd been sold a pup; Oz was far more exciting than the hardscrabble toil of her family homestead. Life for settlers in the "oblong states" of the West was tough, mean and short. Reading Willa Cather, I'd assumed she knew about frontier life on the Great Plains because, although her family was originally Welsh, she'd been born on a farm in Virginia in 1873. But the Cathers were an upwardly mobile family; Willa's father had switched from farming to real estate and insurance, and Willa went to the University of Nebraska. After she began to get articles published she switched her major and became a writer.

Born in the USA

American fashion labels dominate the high street, but now it's time to welcome the country's homewares into our homes, says Trish Lorenz

Millinery: Hat's your final warning

When convicted anti-Semite John Galliano wore a Homburg-style hat (popular with Hasidic Jews), it upset many in the Jewish community. But the danger of wearing the wrong titfer is everywhere. Wear a bowler and you look  like a banker (or an East London trendy).

More headlines

Broken Republic, By Arundhati Roy
The Beautiful and the Damned,

In the years since Arundhati Roy won the 1997 Booker Prize for her debut novel, The God of Small Things, she has become the anti-globalisation mascot in India and abroad with her strident opposition of the Indian state, free market economics, the war on terror, and much else. Her prose is vivid and sometimes poetic: witty wordplay interspersed with biting satire that riles India's middle class, the wealthy, and the elite.