News America’s rise and fall: Occupy Wall Street protesers march through New York City in 2011

Individual debts collectively worth millions are abolished for just $400,000

The killer oceans: What really wiped out the dinosaurs?

Did asteroids really wipe out the dinosaurs? Scientists now think rising sea-levels were to blame – and they could threaten our survival too. Sanjida O'Connell reports

Dorian Leigh: 'Supermodel' of the 1940s

An icon whose look and style defined the fashion world of the 1940s, Dorian Leigh is widely regarded as having been the first "supermodel". In 1946 she appeared on seven Vogue covers, and over the next six years was on more than 50 covers of such magazines as Life, Look and McCall's. In the early 1950s, she featured in a series of famous images for Revlon's "Fire and Ice" campaign promoting nail-polish and lipstick ("For you who love to flirt with fire; who dare to skate on thin ice"), ravishingly shot in a jewelled dress and red cape by Richard Avedon.

CO2 emissions up by nearly a fifth in 12 years

Carbon dioxide emissions caused by UK consumers increased by almost a fifth between 1992 and 2004, research revealed today.

Briton guilty of double murder

Briton Neil Entwistle was found guilty of the murders of his American wife and baby daughter today.

Mary Kate Olsen - she wants to be alone

The Olsen twins are on different paths – and that's fine by Mary-Kate, hears kaleem aftab

My Way: Claire Lister, MD of Pitman Training, on how to do well

'Accountants always find work'

A US educationist claims to have the answer to failing schools – and it lies in literacy

Hilary Wilce talks to Robert Slavin and visits a school that's putting his ideas into practice

Neil Entwistle - For sale: the story of my wife's murder

A British computer worker who concealed massive debts and a fascination with casual sex behind a facade of domestic harmony murdered his American wife and their baby daughter before fleeing to the UK with the apparent intent of selling his story "to the highest bidder", a US court heard yesterday.

Miracle Seeker required to fulfil owner's dream

The stresses of the risk-management business, the cut and thrust of the boardroom and the high-rolling world of telephone-number money are one thing, the thrill of horseracing quite another. Dominic Burke is group chief executive of brand leader Jardine Lloyd Thompson, a company with 30 outposts around the globe, but nothing in his commercial life has prepared him for the thrill of what will happen tomorrow at Epsom. "I have 6,000 staff and I'm trying to run an international business," he said, "but I can't sleep."

Briton accused of killing family in US 'will not receive fair trial'

Lawyers for a British man accused of murdering his wife and baby daughter have failed in their last-ditch attempt to get the case moved or dismissed, after insisting he could not get a fair trial.

Siegmund Nissel: Amadeus Quartet second violin

The term "to play second fiddle" is commonly taken to indicate inferiority. There was certainly nothing inferior in the playing of Siegmund Nissel, who was second violin in the Amadeus Quartet, the celebrated string quartet founded in London just after the Second World War. Nissel was not only a very accomplished musician in his own right but he was also greatly respected as a teacher.

Women's studies are alive and well

Media reports have declared that the subject is dead. But our investigation shows it is surviving – and tackling today's issues.

The miracle in Madagascar – a blueprint for saving species

A study aimed at preventing the continued destruction of wildlife in Madagascar is being heralded as a scientific triumph that could act as a blueprint to save many other species from mass extinction.

Dan H. Laurence: George Bernard Shaw scholar

Dan H. Laurence was the bibliographer's bibliographer. In the painstaking search for the publications, in any form, of any writer, no one else was more pertinacious and skilful. Books and signed articles were easy, although he was adept at spotting unrecorded variant issues. But when it came to tracing a letter to a newspaper, an anonymous paragraph or some other ephemeral piece, with no more to go on than a vague or casual mention in an author's correspondence, he was in his element.

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'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

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300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

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Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk