News America’s rise and fall: Occupy Wall Street protesers march through New York City in 2011

Individual debts collectively worth millions are abolished for just $400,000

Harriet Harman: The force is with her

Gordon Brown is stricken. His party is slumping in the polls. Could this be the deputy leader’s big moment?

How the gribble can power our cars

It sounds like a fantasy character created by Roald Dahl, or played by Jim Carrey – the gribble. But in fact it's a small marine creature resembling a woodlouse, and it may provide the key to a major breakthrough for biofuels in Britain.

Servants of the Supernatural, By Antonio Melechi

Although the author's membership of the Anomalous Experience Research Unit at York University inevitably brings to mind the academic protagonists of Ghostbusters, this is a scrupulous and absorbing account of the Victorian supernatural obsession.

Antony Hegarty: I am an artist

He was turned down by the Royal College of Art, but now the award-winning lead singer of Antony and the Johnsons has his own exhibition. By Charlotte Cripps

Losses are too much to bear for high fliers in the financial crisis

Adolf Merckle is the richest, but he is not the first to become overwhelmed by the pressures being inflicted on people across the world by the credit crisis. In the UK, the City was shocked in September when the New Zealand-born Kirk Stephenson, 47, apparently threw himself in front of a train in Buckinghamshire. He was COO of Olivant, a private equity firm that a year earlier was among the potential bidders for Northern Rock. An inquest heard that Mr Stephenson faced "considerable financial loss" and had become more tense. He left a wife and child.

Conor Cruise O'Brien: Irish intellectual with a long career as journalist, politician, literary critic and public servant

The author of just two competent stage plays, Conor Cruise O'Brien was the most important public man of letters Ireland witnessed since W.B. Yeats died in 1939.

Titan jails 'will repeat mistakes made in US'

Building giant "Titan" prison complexes will lead Britain towards a "American-style" justice system, a leading US civil rights lawyer will warn today.

Experts urge campaign to boost breastfeeding

Britain must adopt a national strategy to encourage breastfeeding, experts say today. The battle cry "breast is best" has been promoted by the childbirth lobby for decades, but 40 per cent of women in the UK who start to breastfeed give up by the time their baby is six weeks old.

Heavy hitter: Philip Seymor Hoffman

He conforms to few notions of what a Hollywood leading man should be like. But no actor has a more compelling presence, and now London has the chance to see him make his mark as a director for the stage

Survivors to be asked: what is death like?

Heart attack patients who have seen the light during clinical death may offer answers to one of life's most baffling questions: what happens when we die?

Bill Colleran: Leading music publisher

Bill Colleran was a prominent music publisher. For many years he was a director of Universal Edition, the British branch of the Viennese firm of the same name, one of the most distinguished and innovative music publishers of the 20th century. In particular, UE championed, promoted and established, in a wide-ranging catalogue of modern and classical composers, the music of Schoenberg, Berg and Webern (the "Second Viennese School"), which dominated the musical avant-garde from about 1906 until after 1970, when general interest in modernism began to decline under the return of conservative populist regimes and thinking, and the gradual removal of the arts from education.

Earn while you learn

Being skint at university is all part of the student image. It’s bohemian, it’s smelly, it’s grimy and it’s cool. It’s not hard to come across groups of students competing on who’s got the lowest bank balance.

UK accused over greenhouse gases

Britain's CO2 emissions are increasing, contrary to government claims, according to two new reports.

UK's marine ecologists start to think big

Sturgeon stroll to the Humber aims to raise sights on fish conservation
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'