News David Cameron visited East Anglia at the times of the floods to see the damage and meet members of the local emergency services

Repairing or improving flood defences is so expensive that areas of countryside which are still under water could be deserted, says Environment Agency

Ministers want to set up traffic courts to reduce court delays

Special courts will deal will traffic-light jumpers and speeding motorists

Ministers want to free up time for more serious cases

Yoda's been around for the best part of a millennium

Organisers use the Force as Star Wars and Doctor Who fans clash at Norwich convention

Trouble flared at the fourth Norwich Sci-Fi and Film Convention at the University of East Anglia, which was organised by the Norwich Star Wars Club

Can Ukip handle the trials of local government?

The party will need to convert eurosceptic zeal to dealing with complaints about drains

Laughing policemen: of the 343 local authorities assessed in the index, 278 are more peaceful now than they were ten years ago

Fall in violent crime: Britain - land of law and order

We’re constantly regaled with tales of our broken society. But a new report has revealed that violent crime is falling – and faster than in any other European country. Emily Dugan explains how it all went right

Canon Keith Weston: Bible expositor known as one of the finest of his generation

Keith Weston, rector of St Ebbe's Church, Oxford, was widely regarded as one of the foremost Bible expositors of his generation. He played a vital part in an ambitious plan by the then Inter-Varsity Fellowship (now UCCF) to see Bible-teaching churches in all UK and Irish university towns. Weston's twofold ministry was to allow scripture to inform the thinking of his church members in whatever sphere they served, and to raise up other preachers who would do the same.

Suing for tripping on a kerb: Surely police officers know what they’re getting into when they sign up?

A police officer is suing a garage owner for an injury sustained while checking the premises on a 999 call

Pc corrects her father: damages claim WILL go ahead after trip at suspected break-in garage

A police officer is going ahead with legal action against a petrol station owner after she tripped on a kerb while attending a suspected break-in, despite her father saying she planned to drop it.

Hospital wards will have to ask for marks out of five

Anyone admitted to hospital will soon be able to see what former patients thought of the care they received on a ward-by-ward basis, the NHS will announce today.

A police officer will sue a petrol station owner on whose property she tripped and - she claims- injured herself

Policewoman in Norfolk sues petrol station owner over alleged injuries she got during a call-out

Leading MP says eventual ruling could have 'huge implications for every citizen'

Weather warning issued for snow and ice as commuters are told to prepare for possible Monday rush-hour disruption

Commuters are being warned that snow fall could disrupt journeys during today's rush-hour as the band of sleet and snow turns heavier overnight

British grandmother Jennifer Mills-Westley

Bulgarian drug addict Deyan Deyanov found guilty of stabbing and beheading British pensioner in Tenerife

A Bulgarian drug addict who beheaded a British grandmother in a frenzied knife attack on the holiday island of Tenerife was today found guilty of murder.

Family of British grandmother stabbed to death and beheaded in Tenerife knife attack come face to face with killer as trial gets underway

Dean Valentinov Deyanov beheaded the British grandmother and ran into the street with her severed head shouting "God is on Earth"

Paperback review: This Isn't The Sort Of Thing That Happens to Someone Like You, By Jon McGregor

Last year, Jon McGregor won one of the richest literary prizes, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, which hopefully brought him to wider recognition (and gave his bank balance a boost).

Geoff Fisher of The Apple Shop has been forced to change the name of his business after he was inundated by callers asking for phone and computer repairs

That takes the pip! Apple brand forces name change at cider store

People calling with an iPod problem were told to have a nice cider to get over it

Man and woman found dead at Norfolk house

Police are investigating after a man and woman were found dead inside a house.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent