PM signals support for anti-terror action in North Africa

MPs told groups linked to al-Qa’ida represent a 'large threat' needing a 'robust response'

Jim Armitage: As far as oil and gas workers are concerned, money trumps risk

Global Outlook Engineers are a tough breed. Oil and gas engineers the toughest of the bunch. You have to be to work in the kinds of places with the most oil. Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Pakistan, Africa. Where there's oil, there's trouble.

Editorial: David Cameron's mixed signals on terrorism

The official view is that the UK does not negotiate or pay ransom to kidnappers
Colosseum at El Jem

Tunisia: Treasures for the taking

It's been two years since the Arab Spring uprising, yet tourists have failed to return to Tunisia in any numbers. All the more reason to pay a visit

Centamin surges after production boom

The gold miner Centamin shrugged off its recent troubles in Egypt today as it shattered production targets, sending the company's shares surging.

Simon Calder's Holiday Helpdesk: Is it safe to cruise the Nile?

Q. I want to cruise the Nile this year, and stay one night in Cairo. Is it safe to cruise the Nile - and also what about the problems in Cairo?

Editorial: Egypt's revolution is not yet lost

The troubled passage of Egypt's post-Mubarak constitution illustrates many of the difficulties facing that country today. After so long in the shadows, the Muslim Brotherhood's leaders are not accustomed to exercising power. The population is split between secular, Western-orientated reformers and those of a more religious and inward-looking persuasion. Political progress has not been matched by improvements in the economy, rather the reverse. With the drop in tourism and economic activity generally, Egypt's leaders cannot afford to buy off jaded voters, even if they wanted to.

Cairo: Protesters have been thrown into confusion by Morsi's move

The West can’t direct the Arab Spring, but we can support it

You can't expect mature politics to be practised in countries like Egypt where political parties have been banned for 50 years

Algeria: Colonial past haunts François Hollande

President François Hollande has acknowledged that France’s colonisation of Algeria had been “brutal and unfair” but stopped short of making an apology to the oil-rich North African state.

Thousands flee South Sudan clashes and seek UN refuge

Youths armed with sticks, machetes and spears battled police in a South Sudanese town, forcing thousands of civilians to seek refuge in a UN compound, the United Nations and residents said.

Cairo: Egyptians await the result of a ballot on a draft constitution

Egyptians appear to back charter but Opposition alleges vote fraud

Egypt's main opposition bloc on Sunday alleged widespread fraud and called for mass protests after preliminary results showed supporters of a controversial draft constitution winning a solid majority in the first round of balloting.

Egyptians vote on divisive Islamist-backed constitution

With their nation's future at stake, Egyptians lined up today to vote on a draft constitution after weeks of turmoil that have left them deeply divided between Islamist supporters of the charter and those who fear it will usher in religious rule.

Hamdeen Sabbahy (C), former independent Nasserist candidate in Egypt's presidential elections, gives a speech in Cairo’s landmark Tahrir square on November 30, 2012, as demonstrators stage a sit-in protest against a decree by President Mohamed Morsi granting himself broad powers that shield his decisions from judicial review.

Opponents of Egypt's Morsi-backed charter urge 'no' vote instead of boycott

Egypt's fractious opposition urged its supporters Wednesday to vote "no" on a contentious Islamist-backed draft constitution but left open the possibility of boycotting Saturday's vote altogether if several conditions were not met.

Cairo: Protesters have been thrown into confusion by Morsi's move

Confusion pervades Egypt's opposition after Morsi rescinds decree

Confusion and disarray pervaded the ranks of Egypt's opposition on Sunday night, a day after President Mohammed Morsi made a gesture toward compromise by rescinding the controversial decree that had granted him near-absolute power and plunged the country into political crisis.

An opposition protester outside the presidential palace

Egypt's Morsi rescinds decree

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi early Sunday annulled most of an extraordinary decree that gave him near-absolute power and has plunged this nation into a deeply divisive political crisis.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine