News Edward Snowden said that he will not be able to return to the US while 'there's no chance to have a fair trial'

But the whistleblower says he cannot go home when there’s ‘no chance to have a fair trial’

Plant hire firm helps storm clean-up

Cleaning up after Hurricane Sandy last November has led to booming revenues in the US for the plant-hire company Ashtead.

BP resigned to trial over Gulf of Mexico oil spill

BP has poured cold water on the prospects of settling a crucial court case due to begin in New Orleans on Monday that would determine its level of responsibility for the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

British musicians gobble up largest-ever share of American albums market

The success of homegrown acts One Direction, Adele and Mumford & Sons helped push UK artists to their biggest-ever share of the US albums market last year.

Toyota boosts profits outlook thanks to US sales and weak yen

The world's biggest-selling car maker Toyota has kicked its profit forecast up a gear on the back of strong sales in the United States and the weak yen.

Album review: Local Natives, Hummingbird (Infectious)

Their 2009 debut album saw them compared to Fleet Foxes, who they claimed not to have even heard when they were making it.

Being Modern: Legal highs

Almost halfway through the traditional month of detox seems a good time to examine the grey area of legal highs. That such things exist in the first place can be traced back to the Dangerous Drugs Act of 1920, which represented Britain's first formal drug legislation. Cocaine was banned, with cannabis added to the list in 1928. LSD was prohibited in 1966, and the substance that came to be known as Ecstasy was added a few years later.

As cliffhanger ends, is it time to invest in US?

Problems still loom, but world-class companies are always worth a punt. Emma Dunkley reports

MoD supply reform hits problems

Doubts grow over business case for bringing private sector into military procurement

Mary Dejevsky: Britain should pass its own Magnitsky Act

It is possible that a 44-year-old Russian, whose body was found outside his house in Weybridge two weeks ago, died of natural causes. Such things happen. But this does not alter the fact that Alexander Perepilichnyy's death is mighty convenient. Who benefits? Other Russians whose nefarious activities stood to be exposed by his cooperation with Swiss banking investigators. Nor would they be just any other Russians, but state officials, police, tax officers and others implicated in the case of Sergei Magnitsky.

Richard O'Dwyer faced being the first person to be extradited from Britain to America to face charges of copyright infringement

Student beats extradition to US by paying compensation

Mother’s relief as TVShack founder is told he won’t face trial for ‘internet piracy’

Norton Rose merger to make it No 3

The chief executive of the London-based legal group Norton Rose has predicted the emergence of "15 or 20 truly global law firms" after announcing a merger with the US group Fulbright & Jaworski. Peter Martyr said that the combination will create the world's third biggest law firm.

Apple pares its tax bill on profits made overseas to less than 2%

Apple paid less than 2 per cent tax on its overseas profits after slashing the amount foreign taxmen receive.

Superstorm Sandy may cost States up to $50bn as stock exchange stays shut

First time bad weather has shut NY market for two consecutive days since 1888

Mitt Romney's Gulf gaffe just a ripple in this cliffhanger of a contest

For all the rhetoric and oozing contempt, there's little to choose between them on substance

Match made in heaven carry off economics award

Two "matchmakers" whose work has found practical applications in pairing pupils with schools and organs with transplant patients, yesterday won the Nobel Prize for economics.

Arts and Entertainment
Lennie James’s return as Morgan does not disappoint
artsConquer, TV review
News
people
Arts and Entertainment
Another picture in the photo series (Rupi Kaur)
arts
Life and Style
Baroness Lane-Fox warned that large companies such as have become so powerful that governments and regulators are left behind
techTech giants have left governments and regulators behind
News
Keith Fraser says we should give Isis sympathises free flights to join Isis (AFP)
news
Life and Style
Google celebrates the 126th anniversary of the Eiffel Tower opening its doors to the public for the first time
techGoogle celebrates Paris's iconic landmark, which opened to the public 126 years ago today
News
Cleopatra the tortoise suffers from a painful disease that causes her shell to disintegrate; her new prosthetic one has been custom-made for her using 3D printing technology
newsCleopatra had been suffering from 'pyramiding'
News
people
Arts and Entertainment
Coachella and Lollapalooza festivals have both listed the selfie stick devices as “prohibited items”
music
Sport
Nigel Owens was targeted on Twitter because of his sexuality during the Six Nations finale between England and France earlier this month
rugbyReferee Nigel Owens on coming out, and homophobic Twitter abuse
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 12 March 2015
No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor