Sport NASCAR team owner Gene Haas could launch a bid for a place on the F1 grid

Haas is one half of the successful Stewart-Haas Racing team currently plying their trade in the American motorsport

Children, A bundle of joy?

We love them, of course, but new research suggests that having children makes us unhappy - it's just that none of us feels able to admit it. Susie Mesure (mother of Louis, two) investigates a taboo issue

Woman killed by lightning strike as fiancé proposes

Richard Butler wanted his girlfriend to think they were just taking a scenic hike in the North Carolina mountains, but he had a secret plan. When they got to the top, he was going to pull out a ring and ask her to be his bride. Then lightning struck – three times.

Balloons daredevil completes Channel crossing

A daring adventurer crossed the English Channel today strapped in a chair beneath several dozen helium-filled balloons.

Soldier probed over video of Iraqi children

A US soldier was being investigated today for a "disgraceful" video on his Facebook page taunting Iraqi children by asking if they are gay, engage in sex acts and if they would grow up to be terrorists.

Syd Barrett: A Very Irregular Head, By Rob Chapman

Syd Barrett's career was over as soon as it had begun. Its zenith and nadir followed each other in a matter of months. In autumn 1964, a charming, romantic, artistically inclined youth of 16, he joined a rudimentary blues band called the Tea Set and changed their name to Pink Floyd, after the Christian names of two obscure North Carolina bluesmen.

Tiger can't see woods for trees as Monty blows top

On the day Colin Montgomerie directed a foul-mouthed blast at a tournament director, Tiger Woods coped with his own golfing hardships by berating only himself. Opening his second comeback event Woods recorded a miserable 74 to leave him nine off the early lead and in danger of missing the cut at the Quail Hollow Championship.

Travel Agenda: North Carolina Museum of Art; BBC's David Shukman; Mawazine Festival

Today: The North Carolina Museum of Art reopens in Raleigh after a major renovation. There will be a new light-filled building surrounded by sculpture gardens and more than 100 new acquisitions, including a Rodin statue. A free festival celebrates the opening ( ncartmuseum.org ).

Scientists declare war over BPA

Study finds chemical has no effect on rats – but critics say their research is flawed

Thailand close to political anarchy as protesters parade their dead through Bangkok

Red-shirted protesters paraded coffins through Thailand's capital today in a renewed attempt to pressure the government to step down after street fighting left 21 people dead, pushing this Southeast Asian nation closer to political anarchy.

Charity that sterilises addicts to come to UK

Drug addiction experts have reacted with horror at the revelation that a controversial American charity worker who pays addicts to be sterilised is setting up a franchise in Britain.

Susie Rushton: Fencing for all hits the mark

Urban Notebook

An Evening with David Sedaris, Leicester Square Theatre, London

'New Yorker' stories combine cleverness and consolation

Rupert Cornwell: Are we going to see Ronald Reagan on America's $50 bill?

Out of America: Deep-seated US conservatism when it comes to bank notes may yet keep Ulysses S Grant in place

A nice little earner
for Nintendo fans

Got a stack of old consoles and games cluttering up your loft?

Kathryn Grayson: Actress and singer described as 'the most beautiful woman in the history of movies'

The singer and actress Kathryn Grayson was a resident soprano at MGM from 1940 until the early Fifties, her films including the acclaimed versions of Show Boat and Kiss Me, Kate. She was particularly favoured by producer Joe Pasternak, who had moved from Universal, where he had brilliantly handled the career of Deanna Durbin. Grayson's operatic background and training appealed to the producer, who liked to mix classics with popular songs in his musicals.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent