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Makenzie Wethington broke her pelvis, spine, shoulder, several ribs and a tooth in the fall

THE CRITICS: EXHIBITIONS: Realism doesn't come much dirtier

Larry Clark Photology, London Substance Dazed and Confused, London

When a twister came to Selly Oak

THE RESIDENTS of Wellman Croft in Selly Oak, Birmingham were a bit lost for words yesterday. As one woman, staring at her bedding plants - now in next door's back garden - explained: "Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma. Then suddenly there's a tornado coming down our street."

Gas for $700m

Gas for $700m

Letter: Tornados

Sir: You carried a picture (6 May) of some of the devastation that tornadoes wreaked across Oklahoma, with a death toll in the mid-40s. On the opposite page, adult Oklahomans (not a child to be seen) were pictured in a frenzy trying to buy Star Wars toys for a film which has yet to open. As Homer Simpson might observe, "Hmmm. America."

Oklahoma finds solace in the Lord after the night of the giant twisters

By the latest estimates, 41 people were killed by the huge tornadoes that struck Oklahoma City and its suburbs last Monday night. Some were crushed even as they tried to take cover - in cupboards, under mattresses or in bathtubs. Others were hurled through the air, sometimes for miles. One woman was vacuumed out through her car window when there was no room left for her to park beneath a flyover.

Oklahoma tornado death toll still rising

RESIDENTS OF some of the suburbs of Oklahoma City most severely damaged by Monday night's tornadoes were finally allowed back to their ruined homes yesterday as officials struggled to settle on a final death toll for the disaster.

Midwest tornadoes: Troops patrol devastated suburbs

Death toll stands at 44 as US army allows survivors to return to a rubble-strewn landscape

Monitor: All the News of the World: US comment on the tornadoes that devastated parts of the Mid-West

THERE WAS a sense that the storm was occurring right in front of a nationwide audience, and it undermined once again the persistent naive feeling, which is always being undermined, that what we can watch so closely we can somehow control. Those on the scene know in fact that the only way to control your fate when a tornado strikes is to break off watching and head for the storm cellar. From The Wizard of Oz to Monday afternoon, we have perpetuated the myth of a kind of visual coexistence with twisters. But to watch your own tornado is a little like watching your own funeral. The wonder about Monday's storm, given its path, is not that so many died but that so many did not.

Twister's trail of terror kills 45

DOZENS OF people were killed and thousands left homeless yesterday after a series of vast tornadoes swept across Oklahoma and Kansas.

Tornado Disaster: Clash of air masses in Tornado Alley

TORNADOES FORM in the unstable atmosphere of a thunderstorm, when winds of opposite direction meet and start a column of air spinning.

Tornado Disaster: It came like a jet plane - nothing in science could halt it

DEREK SINNES stands by the empty space that was once occupied by his trailer home. Yesterday, all that remained were the cinder blocks that used to hold it off the ground. I ask him what became of his home of 21 years and he gestures helplessly to the tangled mess before him.

Tornado Disaster: It came like a jet plane, and nothing in science could halt it

SOME COMPARED it to the sound of a jumbo jet or a train coming through the house. Others remembered the bomb that destroyed the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. The destruction was sudden, terrible and all but irresistible, regardless of how sophisticated America is becoming in its ability to predict and spot these vast natural bulldozers that sweep across the plains states every year.

Tornado Disaster: Twister's trail of terror kills 43

DOZENS OF people were killed and thousands left homeless yesterday after a series of vast tornadoes swept across Oklahoma and Kansas.

Friday Book: It ain't necessarily so

Suits Me: The Double Life Of Billy Tipton By Diane Wood Middlebrook, Virago, pounds 20

Theatre: The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe

Adrian Mitchell must be one of British theatre's least-recognised talents. Still known mainly for his freewheeling performance poetry, it is often forgotten that he wrote the verse translation for Peter Brook's legendary 1964 RSC production of Peter Weiss's Marat/Sade. He has also written a heap of stories, verse and plays specifically for children, including dramatisations of work by Hans Christian Andersen and Beatrix Potter. It is this affinity with the fantastical which the artistic director of the RSC, Adrian Noble, has harnessed to adapt The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, a book responsible for generations of children spending inordinate amounts of time expectantly pushing through coat-racks. Designed by the award-winning Anthony Ward (whose recent credits include The Invention of Love and Oklahoma!), this lavish production has been mounted to coincide with the centenary of CS Lewis's birth and will definitely not be just for Christmas. It transfers to London in the Spring.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003