News Max Mosley explained why he gave financial help to victims of hacking to sue papers

If Monday’s Commons debate was post-Leveson showdown lite, today’s Culture, Media and Sport Committee hearing was the real thing. We had Max Mosley, who famously won a 2008 court action against the (late) News of the World after it turned over his private life. And we had at least three Tory MPs who could barely contain their fury at Hacked Off’s starring role in the Ed Miliband-hosted talks which secured the cross-party regulation deal with David Cameron.

Letwin promises £2bn tax cuts for low-paid workers

The Conservative Party will direct most of its remaining £2.7bn of promised tax cuts at the low paid, Oliver Letwin, the shadow Chancellor, says.

He's been back only a week but Campbell is in the soup already

Alastair Campbell is back, and his old enemies are circling, desperate to settle old scores. The man who left Downing Street 18 months ago after nine years as Tony Blair's consigliere is back at his side for the general election.

Cover Story: You've got to draw the line somewhere

Racist pundits, reckless royals and overzealous admen: all stand accused of `going too far'. But who's deciding where the boundaries of taste and decency lie? John Walsh goes beyond the pale...

Why the Liberal Democrats want your `wasted' votes

There was a glint in Charles Kennedy's eye as he commented on this week's poll in the Independent on Sunday, which indicated that if people believed that the Liberal Democrats could win in their local constituency, 39 per cent of electors would vote for his party. While he did not exactly brief a recent gathering of hacks that he was ordering his troops to "go back to your constituencies and prepare for government", he did remark that such a poll rating "would imply a Lib Dem government with a majority in excess of 120".

Labour criticised for 'anti-Semitic' Howard poster

A proposed Labour Party poster depicting the Tory leader Michael Howard in a pose resembling Shakespeare's Shylock has prompted fresh claims of anti-Semitism.

Tories urge reform of capital gains tax

The Conservatives outlined plans for a radical shake-up of capital gains tax (CGT) yesterday, including the option of scrapping it altogether at a cost to the Exchequer of some £2bn.

Jason Nissé: Just how lucky is the Chancellor feeling?

After the pre-Budget report (PBR), you have to wonder who the real opposition is. If you were looking for someone to question the Chancellor's numbers seriously, neither the Tories nor the Lib Dems fitted the bill. Shadow chancellor Oliver Letwin jumped about, but he was like one of those cartoon characters being held at arm's-length and swinging their punches into thin air. And Vince Cable's offering was so low-key, it soun-ded like a background hum.

I'd rather beg, said Letwin. To get his children into the new academy, he'd have to

Oliver Letwin once said he would rather beg in the street than send his son to a state school near his London home. Tomorrow, there will be a state-funded school in Lambeth, south London, where he lives, where he would have to beg to get his children into it; and his begging would be in vain.

Tories plan to axe 4,000 DTI jobs

More than 4,000 jobs would be shed at the Department of Trade and Industry under plans being unveiled by the Conservatives.

The Sketch: Paul Boateng, the executive searching for a kind of dignity

The British constitution has its dignified parts and its executive parts.

Letwin says Tories would bring about 'regime change' at FSA

The Conservative Party would radically prune the remit of the Financial Services Authority if it were elected, on the back of a groundswell of criticism of the City regulator among UK companies.

Letwin attacked by children's charity over call for closure

Oliver Letwin, the shadow Chancellor was criticised by a children's charity yesterday after he suggested that it was a quango that could be abolished as part of his plans to save £1.7bn.

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003