Arts and Entertainment

Bob Dylan, I can take him or leave him. Sorry, but it's true. Oh I get that Bob is a big deal. You can bang on all you like about how he's a peerless songwriter and poet and maverick who changed popular culture for ever, and I will nod sagely in agreement.

Open Eye: Your Letters: Memories are made of this

Thank you for Open Eye. I enjoyed reading your anniversary issue, reminding me, as it did, of the great debt I owe to the Open University.

Letter: Born to be bad?

Sir: Sanjida O'Connell's excellent survey of the debate about biological determinism ("Do we choose to be good?", 11 June) omits any mention of the places where the developing science will be transformed into gripping drama: the law courts.

Independent Graduate: Buckle down, or buckle under

Self-discipline is often one of the hardest skills a postgraduate student must acquire. But it can be learnt, says Emma Williams

Open Eye: There's nothing odd about 200 years of self-help

With names like the Nottingham Ancient Imperial Order of Oddfellows, the Hebrew Order of Druids and the Grand Ancient Order of the Sons of Jacob, they sound like something from a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. But for more than 200 years, Friendly Societies have been central to the lives of millions of people.

Open Eye: Teaching English to teachers in Brazil

The Brazilian government has given the go-ahead to the development of a new OU course for teachers of English in Brazil.

Open Eye: First Wednesday: We are moving!

Starting next month, Open Eye, the magazine of the Open University community and the only alumni magazine in the UK to be published every month, will be published as a supplement to The Independent on the First Wednesday of each month, instead of on the first Thursday.

Open Eye: Revealed at last: secrets of the ceremonies

Yvonne Cook finds out what goes on behind the scenes of the OU's round the world graduation roadshow

Open Eye: From The Vice-Chancellor: The Challenge of Constitutional Change

The creation of the Scottish Parliament is a major constitutional development that will have an important impact on the Open University. Until 1992 the funding links between universities and government were handled centrally for the whole of the UK, and "buffer bodies" such as the University Grants Committee, acted as go-betweens to prevent direct political intervention in academic affairs.

The Critcs - Television: It makes you sad to be English

The shooting of John Lennon. The Lindbergh kidnapping. Nearly a week on, it is still scarcely believable that the name of Jill Dando, of all people, should be added to a list of crimes made particularly shocking by the fame and innocence of the victim. A list of crimes, along with the death of Princess Diana, of where-were-you-when-you-heard? status.

A break from the norm

If you'd rather learn than lie on a beach, summer schools are the answer. By Maureen O'Connor

Letter: Your Views: OU was there years ago

Dr Anne Wright, the chief executive of the University for Industry (YOUR VIEWS, April 8) mentions the "excellent work in lifelong learning of the University of Derby and others up-and-down the country."

Letter: Trial by TV

Sir: Jeff Anderson, the editor of Tonight, offers us a self-contradictory statement in trying to justify the televised interviews of the suspects in the Stephen Lawrence case ("Lawrences object to TV interview", 8 April). It is important to scrutinise Mr Anderson's flawed reasoning now that the programme has been broadcast and has, in the view of many, been seen to have failed to advance the cause of justice in any way.

Open Eye: Improving teaching in HE across the UK

Hefce, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (with the Department for Education for Northern Ireland) has an ambitious project to improve the quality of teaching in higher education spending pounds 83 million over the next three years through its Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund.

Open Eye: Lib Dem's visitor finds 'excitement for OU learning'

Phil Willis MP, the Liberal Democrat voice on Higher Education, visited the Open University in Milton Keynes to discuss key aspects of national higher education policy and view recent developments.

Open Eye: Breaking down barriers

Seeing an OU programme on TV prompted award-winning Basque writer Asun Balzola to sign up for a BA course. She talks to Maria Bengoa about the challenge it presents
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

Typefaces still matter in the digital age

A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics

Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

13 best picnic blankets

Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

On the margins

From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'