Arts and Entertainment

Bob Dylan, I can take him or leave him. Sorry, but it's true. Oh I get that Bob is a big deal. You can bang on all you like about how he's a peerless songwriter and poet and maverick who changed popular culture for ever, and I will nod sagely in agreement.

Open Eye: Your Letters: Memories are made of this

Thank you for Open Eye. I enjoyed reading your anniversary issue, reminding me, as it did, of the great debt I owe to the Open University.

Letter: Born to be bad?

Sir: Sanjida O'Connell's excellent survey of the debate about biological determinism ("Do we choose to be good?", 11 June) omits any mention of the places where the developing science will be transformed into gripping drama: the law courts.

Independent Graduate: Buckle down, or buckle under

Self-discipline is often one of the hardest skills a postgraduate student must acquire. But it can be learnt, says Emma Williams

Open Eye: There's nothing odd about 200 years of self-help

With names like the Nottingham Ancient Imperial Order of Oddfellows, the Hebrew Order of Druids and the Grand Ancient Order of the Sons of Jacob, they sound like something from a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. But for more than 200 years, Friendly Societies have been central to the lives of millions of people.

Open Eye: Teaching English to teachers in Brazil

The Brazilian government has given the go-ahead to the development of a new OU course for teachers of English in Brazil.

Open Eye: First Wednesday: We are moving!

Starting next month, Open Eye, the magazine of the Open University community and the only alumni magazine in the UK to be published every month, will be published as a supplement to The Independent on the First Wednesday of each month, instead of on the first Thursday.

Open Eye: Revealed at last: secrets of the ceremonies

Yvonne Cook finds out what goes on behind the scenes of the OU's round the world graduation roadshow

Open Eye: From The Vice-Chancellor: The Challenge of Constitutional Change

The creation of the Scottish Parliament is a major constitutional development that will have an important impact on the Open University. Until 1992 the funding links between universities and government were handled centrally for the whole of the UK, and "buffer bodies" such as the University Grants Committee, acted as go-betweens to prevent direct political intervention in academic affairs.

The Critcs - Television: It makes you sad to be English

The shooting of John Lennon. The Lindbergh kidnapping. Nearly a week on, it is still scarcely believable that the name of Jill Dando, of all people, should be added to a list of crimes made particularly shocking by the fame and innocence of the victim. A list of crimes, along with the death of Princess Diana, of where-were-you-when-you-heard? status.

Letter: Your Views: OU was there years ago

Dr Anne Wright, the chief executive of the University for Industry (YOUR VIEWS, April 8) mentions the "excellent work in lifelong learning of the University of Derby and others up-and-down the country."

A break from the norm

If you'd rather learn than lie on a beach, summer schools are the answer. By Maureen O'Connor

Letter: Trial by TV

Sir: Jeff Anderson, the editor of Tonight, offers us a self-contradictory statement in trying to justify the televised interviews of the suspects in the Stephen Lawrence case ("Lawrences object to TV interview", 8 April). It is important to scrutinise Mr Anderson's flawed reasoning now that the programme has been broadcast and has, in the view of many, been seen to have failed to advance the cause of justice in any way.

Open Eye: Lib Dem's visitor finds 'excitement for OU learning'

Phil Willis MP, the Liberal Democrat voice on Higher Education, visited the Open University in Milton Keynes to discuss key aspects of national higher education policy and view recent developments.

Open Eye: Breaking down barriers

Seeing an OU programme on TV prompted award-winning Basque writer Asun Balzola to sign up for a BA course. She talks to Maria Bengoa about the challenge it presents

Open Eye: Improving teaching in HE across the UK

Hefce, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (with the Department for Education for Northern Ireland) has an ambitious project to improve the quality of teaching in higher education spending pounds 83 million over the next three years through its Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss