Sport Laura Robson was victorious in Beijing on Sunday

The Brit lost to Kimiko Date-Krumm

OBITUARY : Kenneth Gardner

Kenneth Gardner was an authority in the field of Japanese bibliography and for many years a distinguished librarian first in the British Museum and after 1973 in the British Library. His death came a year after the publication of his Descriptive Catalogue of Japanese Books in the British Library Printed Before 1700. In recognition of this monumental work, he was presented in Osaka in February with the prestigious Yamagata prize, an annual award established by the Osaka prefecture in 1982 to honour foreign scholars. Gardner received in addition the Order of the Sacred Treasure (Third Class), awarded by the Emperor of Japan, in 1979.

Japanese comics take crucial role in party politics

FROM RICHARD LLOYD PARRY

Japanese decide elections are just a laugh

FROM RICHARD LLOYD PARRY

Second secret account is found

F

$300m Singapore rescue plan

THE BARINGS COLLAPSE

THE BARINGS CRISIS : Dealer on the run after losses

Nick Leeson, believed to be the man responsible for the collapse of Barings, is thought to be on the run from Singapore, having left both his wife in the island state and the company in tatters. Single-handedly, he executed unauthorised trades in the futures market worth billions of dollars, incurring a loss of at least £600m.

A simple bear necessity

Tigers, horses, seals, children and other animals: you know that it must be half-term again. One can understand why animals figure so large in fiction for children: both fauna inhabit a parallel universe in close proximity to, but separate from, the adult world. I'm not complaining: these days, when actors are more likely than animals to have a personal trainer (and frankly more likely to need it), and when the words put in their mouths are rarely worth hearing, it's a pleasure to spend a little quality time in the bestiary.

Cholera fear adds to Kobe's misery

More than 300,000 people made homeless in Kobe by the Great Hanshin Earthquake are facing the danger of a cholera outbreak. Eight days after the quake, running water has not been restored, and many of the shelters lack even chemical lavatories.

Kobe survivors now threatened by mud

Emergency food supplies have finally started to pour into Kobe and other devastated areas of Hyogo prefecture, but bone-chilling rain, and the threat of hundreds of landslides, has added to the misery of over 300,000 people made homeless by Tuesda y's earthquake.

Earthquake In Japan: Stricter rules proved their worth

Students and teaching staff at the Kobe Institute, a Japanese outpost of St Catherine's College, Oxford, looked down from the safety of the 1990s campus on the ruins of the seaside city below. Built on the side of the hills surrounding Kobe and de signedto the latest Japanese safety standards, it is one of the few buildings in the city to have escaped almost unscathed.

Earthquake In Japan: Survivors attack `slow aid response'

Kobe - Survivors have accused the Japanese government of dragging its feet in providing aid as the official death toll rose to 4,047, with 21,671 people injured and 727 missing.

EARTHQUAKE IN JAPAN: SURVIVORS: Britons survive night of terror

An estimated 1,500 Britons survived the earthquake but British officials in Osaka fear some may be in danger from the fires now raging out of control.

Hundreds feared dead in Japan quake

A massive earthquake swept through central Japan this morning, killing at least 41 people and trapping hundreds under the rubble of collapsed buildings. A hospital in Takarazuka in Hyogo prefecture was reported to have collapsed.

The airport that rose from the ooze: Osaka wanted an offshore airport, but had no island. No problem: they had one built, three miles long, out of crushed rock on soft clay. Jonathan Glancey marvels at an extraordinary marriage of design and engineering

To write about an airport before using it as a regular passenger might seem almost as silly as flying without wings. But here goes. Kansai International Airport opened at the beginning of this week. Seen from the air, it sits like some immensely long, infinitely delicate steel insect on a man-made island three miles out to sea in the Bay of Osaka and 25 miles from the Japanese city it serves, reached by a bridge carrying road, railway and power.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices