Sport Laura Robson was victorious in Beijing on Sunday

The Brit lost to Kimiko Date-Krumm

OBITUARY : Kenneth Gardner

Kenneth Gardner was an authority in the field of Japanese bibliography and for many years a distinguished librarian first in the British Museum and after 1973 in the British Library. His death came a year after the publication of his Descriptive Catalogue of Japanese Books in the British Library Printed Before 1700. In recognition of this monumental work, he was presented in Osaka in February with the prestigious Yamagata prize, an annual award established by the Osaka prefecture in 1982 to honour foreign scholars. Gardner received in addition the Order of the Sacred Treasure (Third Class), awarded by the Emperor of Japan, in 1979.

Japanese comics take crucial role in party politics

FROM RICHARD LLOYD PARRY

Japanese decide elections are just a laugh

FROM RICHARD LLOYD PARRY

Second secret account is found

F

$300m Singapore rescue plan

THE BARINGS COLLAPSE

THE BARINGS CRISIS : Dealer on the run after losses

Nick Leeson, believed to be the man responsible for the collapse of Barings, is thought to be on the run from Singapore, having left both his wife in the island state and the company in tatters. Single-handedly, he executed unauthorised trades in the futures market worth billions of dollars, incurring a loss of at least £600m.

A simple bear necessity

Tigers, horses, seals, children and other animals: you know that it must be half-term again. One can understand why animals figure so large in fiction for children: both fauna inhabit a parallel universe in close proximity to, but separate from, the adult world. I'm not complaining: these days, when actors are more likely than animals to have a personal trainer (and frankly more likely to need it), and when the words put in their mouths are rarely worth hearing, it's a pleasure to spend a little quality time in the bestiary.

Cholera fear adds to Kobe's misery

More than 300,000 people made homeless in Kobe by the Great Hanshin Earthquake are facing the danger of a cholera outbreak. Eight days after the quake, running water has not been restored, and many of the shelters lack even chemical lavatories.

Kobe survivors now threatened by mud

Emergency food supplies have finally started to pour into Kobe and other devastated areas of Hyogo prefecture, but bone-chilling rain, and the threat of hundreds of landslides, has added to the misery of over 300,000 people made homeless by Tuesda y's earthquake.

Earthquake In Japan: Stricter rules proved their worth

Students and teaching staff at the Kobe Institute, a Japanese outpost of St Catherine's College, Oxford, looked down from the safety of the 1990s campus on the ruins of the seaside city below. Built on the side of the hills surrounding Kobe and de signedto the latest Japanese safety standards, it is one of the few buildings in the city to have escaped almost unscathed.

Earthquake In Japan: Survivors attack `slow aid response'

Kobe - Survivors have accused the Japanese government of dragging its feet in providing aid as the official death toll rose to 4,047, with 21,671 people injured and 727 missing.

EARTHQUAKE IN JAPAN: SURVIVORS: Britons survive night of terror

An estimated 1,500 Britons survived the earthquake but British officials in Osaka fear some may be in danger from the fires now raging out of control.

Hundreds feared dead in Japan quake

A massive earthquake swept through central Japan this morning, killing at least 41 people and trapping hundreds under the rubble of collapsed buildings. A hospital in Takarazuka in Hyogo prefecture was reported to have collapsed.

The airport that rose from the ooze: Osaka wanted an offshore airport, but had no island. No problem: they had one built, three miles long, out of crushed rock on soft clay. Jonathan Glancey marvels at an extraordinary marriage of design and engineering

To write about an airport before using it as a regular passenger might seem almost as silly as flying without wings. But here goes. Kansai International Airport opened at the beginning of this week. Seen from the air, it sits like some immensely long, infinitely delicate steel insect on a man-made island three miles out to sea in the Bay of Osaka and 25 miles from the Japanese city it serves, reached by a bridge carrying road, railway and power.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor